NerdFit: Why Techies Love CrossFit


#1

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#2

They can have fun breaking down the data on the number of SLAP tears and bouts of rhabdomyolysis they collectively experience.

CrossFit was a good idea until it gave up on QC’ing their coaches. Any fool can become a “Level 1 Instructor” for a thousand bucks and a weekend of time.


#3

If you are looking to recruit code monkeys to pull 80+ hour weeks until they burn out I can imagine that going hunting at voluntary-boot-camp-with-dubious-safety-record is actually a good strategy. It should help weed out the ones that are less easily motivated and allow you to observe who easily succumbs to group pressure and who doesn’t. The next step probably involves a frat-style hazing ritual to separate the people who get stock options from the people who don’t…


#4

Oh oh oh… I know… is it because both are insufferable?


#5

This article confirms my existing bias that crossfit attracts a-holes and dudebrahs. In other words, another stupid trend that I can completely ignore. :smile:


#6

To quote a much more insightful person than myself:

“Crossfit is the result of a generation of people growing up watching Goku and Vegeta work out in 100x earth’s gravity.”


#7

anything to distract them from the ephemerality of their ‘value’ i suppose. it’s going to be great fun watching this bubble pop. i’m sure these ‘libertarians’ will come up with really good reasons why they’re entitled to free government cheese in a few years. maybe they can ‘disrupt’ the USDA.


#8

It amazes me how many people love to criticise others’ workouts. A perfectly reasonable article on Crossfit, which doesn’t present it as being better than anything else, brings a slew of sneering responses. It’s not for everyone, it might not be for you - but why the need to critique?

FWIW for me, and my GF, Crossfit has been an amazing, game-changing fitness programme. It’s made us both fitter than we’ve ever been and we love doing it. For me WODs and class-based workouts are so much more fun and interesting than running, or trying to motivate myself to use a weight machine in a more traditional gym. More fun=more training. I am so much fitter in every respect - and happier as a result.

That might not be for you (although I think Crossfit can be brilliant for most people…) but I don’t see why that brings the need to decry it.


#9

i was doing CrossFit before it was cool by writing down my resistances and reps using a ‘notebook’ and a ‘pen’.


#10

Fitter. Happier. More productive.


#11

OK OK, you’re right, it was a cheap shot for an easy laugh. I’m just teasing.

It’s like anything that attracts a cult-like following–the zealots and evangelists are the most visible adherents. It shares a lot with the tech industry–young people looking for a magic bullet solution, being Agile and Disruptive and all that.

If it motivates you to be fit and healthy, good for you. Just be aware of some of the legitimate long term health problems that can come from too much overly intense exercise. And don’t get too defensive :slight_smile:


#12

It’s great you’ve found a workout you enjoy doing, but the people in the article are using this latest exercise trend for icky corporate HR “bonding” activities.


#13

Wasn’t really sure what crossfit is, other than some kind of workout regimen. Still am not after the article, but then I gave up on a few paragraphs in because it assumed I knew too much already and didn’t bother even with a lead-in description of the subject at hand (like the pros do.)

Guess I could research it myself, then come back, but----squirrel!


#14

It’s a fitness regime where you read forums and blogs until you get all worked up and cross, and then presto, rock hard abs.


#15

If that were true, I’d be Mr. Universe by now.


#16

It seems to me that there is a little too much variation between CrossFit gyms that they can all be universally praised or shunned – though that doesn’t seem to have stopped anyone from doing so.

But there are definitely other kinds of group fitness classes out there, and many of them are almost certainly safer.


#17

The problems that people mention most often have to do with two major problems that are very common in crossfit gyms.

First: the throwing away of proper form and control for the idea of 'MORE REPS MORE FAST CONFUSE YOUR MUSCLES", which can lead to significant and long-lasting injury.

Second: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhabdomyolysis - this huffpo article (as much as I hate giving them bandwidth) does a good job of overviewing the problem http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-robertson/crossfit-rhabdomyolysis_b_3977598.html which mostly comes down to ‘when people treat crossfit exercise as DBZ-style workouts, you end up with some insane injury’.

Now, are these preventable problems? Sure. But as many people who have either done crossfit themselves or have friends into it can attest, the idea of ‘more weight, harder, faster, forget form’ is widely practiced and any weightlifter will tell you it’s a great way to end up with a crippling injury.

Edit: For instance if this article were about hot yoga or some random martial arts, then sure, whatever knock yourself out. But as far as myself and many others are concerned, Crossfit is a good way to end up with a potentially crippling injury.


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#19

…well protected by a gelatinous cushioning layer.


#20

From Teh Twitters: