William Blake's final drawings given a spectacular send up


#1

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#2

Dante’s The Diving Comedy

A tale divided into three canticas: The Locker Room, The Deep End, The Public Showers.


#3

yeah, some poofreding may be in order


#4

I heard that one (belly) flopped. Dante’s ruminations on what should happen to its critics was then part of the inspiration for the Inferno section of The Divine Comedy.


#5

“A spectacular send up”

To me, send up means parody. Which left me very confused. Maybe its a Britishism?


#6

Well, I was thinking it must be a new Illitischism, like breaks on a car. Did he mean “Send off”?


#7

Obligatory (at least, I would hope…)

From Blake’s “Auguries of Innocence” & “He who binds himself to a joy,” brought to music by Bill Douglas and the Ars Nova Singers –
To see a world in a grain of sand,
And heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
And eternity in an hour.

He who binds himself to a joy
Does the winged life destroy:
He who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity’s sun rise.


#8

In before the Jacques Cousteau jokes.


#9

No. It’s not.


#10

Sound like it made a big splash on him!
(Too easy)


#11

Maybe a bit more of a contemporary reference…


#12

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