Women (but not men) with high GPAs are less likely to get job offers


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/03/26/your-loss-toots.html


#2

This looks like a job for sad trombone noise.


#3

Dear world. You suck today.


#4

TL;DR - Men (and women trained to do hiring by and for a male-dominated culture) feel threatened by intelligent women.

Film at 11.


#5

GenderAchievementCallback

Image is from the referenced article

Hiring priorities cheat sheet to Make Your Workplace Great Again:

Best: A woman with a B/B+ hits the sweet spot as far as getting work done effectively and still letting you feel superior. She is preferred over any other candidate (including men with higher grades).

Mid-tier: Men with good grades come next, followed by men with poor grades.

Last resort: If no-one else is available, women with GREAT grades (A-/A) are mildly preferred over women with poor grades (C+/B-).


#6

Thanks for pulling the most relevant graph from the paper. This one really clarifies the point that the article is making.


#7

mayhaps you can also justify how women should be paid less if you don’t hire the “best” female candidates in the first place (not that gpa is the best indicator).


#8

Move along folks! No sexism to see here!


#9

I’m not surprised. I swear the fact that I majored in arts and performances has helped, not hindered, my career in software development. At this point I’ve been working so long no one is going to care or ask, but when I was first getting hired I was surprised how much more a background in music and theatre was valued. Seeming docile and obedient while accidentally being able to do your job is the norm so far as I can tell, or was. I learned everything on the fly so I guess acting does help. I did have a stellar GPA actually because I obsessed over it to the point of near self-destruction, but the fact that it was basically in an irrelevant major helps ensure a safe amount of stupidity. Too bad they were wrong and I’d been playing that same game since childhood. Head down, smile always, let them call you stupid, look for the weak points, attack covertly… J/K I’m just doing a really seriously involved character and I’m a devoted method actor.


#10

To be fair, C is “passing/satisfactory” not “poor.”


#11

The separate breakdown for Math majors shows a larger effect in the top bracket. Somehow, this one makes me particularly upset.

MathMjrs


#12

Apologies. Yes, and the data are striking enough on their own, without stretching for a satirical narrative.


#13

I’m going to tell my college bound daughter to always do A work and then ask for a B+. Problem solved!


#14

Also, it appears that middle management men are especially afraid of women with business degrees - ya know, chicks who might steal their jobs!!


#15

Once upon a time, long long ago.


#16

I am a professor at two public universities. We have not told our students that a C grade is poor academic achievement. Nor have we adjusted our policies regarding (a) admission, (b) degree requirements, (c) graduation based on a C grade somehow no longer meaning “passing/satisfactory.” I’ve been in curricular and admissions meetings where this specific issue was raised explicitly on more than one occasion.

Now upon a time, and right here in public education USA.


#17

That graph appears to show that women earning B averages receive more callbacks than men, and A average men and women receive the same rate of callbacks. Only the C average men receive more callbacks in the business majors, if I’m reading that graph correctly?


#18

Yeah the bar for the C average men makes me reluctant to interpret anything from the graph now that I see it over there!


#19

:rofl:
 


#20

In other words, if you’re recruiting, try to attract as many female applicants as possible, so that you can pick up the highly qualified candidates being passed over by your competitors.