You didn't find a meteorite

Exactly. Reminds me of one of those “questions” that I get from my spouse, you know, the kind with a right answer.

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Worse, at least for some of the people in the theater that night.

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That was the premise of the original “blob,” wasn’t it?

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Man, Kevin Sorbo has not aged well.

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From http://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/1723 :

First of all the chance of actually being near a falling meteorite is exceedingly small. From the flowchart is a link to a 64 point long checklist, which basically all ends in “…, then it’s not a meteorite.” In point 3 is noted the following:

Since 1900, the numbers of recognized meteorite “falls” is about 690 for the whole Earth. That’s 6.3 per year. Only 98 of those occurred in the US. That’s less than 1 per year. Even when a meteorite is observed to fall, experienced meteorite hunters may find only a few stones when hunting dawn to dusk for a week.

Second, meteors that can be seen falling almost definitely cannot be found on the ground immediately after. Any meteor big enough to glow and be visible while falling all the way to the ground will leave a large impact crater, rather than simply sit on the ground as a rock. Smaller meteors do not fall fast enough to glow all the way to the ground.

I recommend reading the whole thing. Explain xkcd is a place I often go the day after an xkcd is released; even if I get the joke, I often learn something new.

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Those do not resemble rocks.

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That is correct from one point of view.

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I’m trying to think of what the other point of view could be. Does it involve lead exposure?

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The leaden sky yields
No rocks, yet it weights my soul.
My viewpoint, Fallen.

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My god, what the hell happened to Fabio???

…oh, wait, nevermind…

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