Your personal privacy isn't the only cost of NSA surveillance


#1

[Permalink]


#2

“We will bankrupt ourselves in the vain search for absolute security.”

-Some guy who was soft on nazis and communists and definitely had no national security experience whatsoever…


#3

But Y’know, Terrorism! And National Security! Those hoity toity abstractions- U.S. tech economy, internet openness, America’s foreign policy interests, cybersecurity- are not the business of the American people, those are now national security assets that you and I don’t have the security clearance to properly discuss. And trying to discuss those things without being vetted first, that’s just going to get you on the watch-list.

You may be either with us or against us, but only we are qualified to determine which side you are on.


#4

You would think somebody from Cisco would have pointed out the NSA is bad for business. And a lot of US policy is about protecting corporate interests. In this case, I wonder if their complaints were ignored because it’s all Snowden’s fault?


#5

Al Qaeda should announce a Strategic Defense Initiative to really hit us with a second punch.


#6

“But if you look closer, the more accurate story is that in the name of
security, we’re trading away not only privacy, but also the U.S. tech
economy, internet openness, America’s foreign policy interests and
cybersecurity.”

If only it were being traded away. It’s being given away. The surveillance is probably making Americans, on average, less safe, not more safe.


#7

Since the NSA revelations, government regulations in my industry (in Australia) now forbids us from using offshore cloud providers of any kind. And we’re meant to be one of your closest allies.

It’s actually been a decent boost for our local IT startup scene, so I guess you have to take the good with the bad.


#8

You mean you take the good for Australia with the bad for America?


#9

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.