Zooming into the moon with "the world's sharpest tele lens"

Originally published at: Zooming into the moon with "the world's sharpest tele lens" | Boing Boing

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It really is made of cheese.

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Clicked expecting a BoingBoing Shop ad. Relieved.

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If only the Hubble had a few more 2x extenders they could have been a contender.

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Possibly Wensleydale or Stilton

D4NfFWu

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Shadow flies across the surface at 2:59 from the bottom right. Neat

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I always thought it was cream cheese.

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Focal length 57.6 m (189 ft) [6]
Focal ratio f/24

The Leica is only 2.240 m, f/16.

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Can I spot the NASA moonlander in this?

Always wondered that … could the Hubble?

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Hubble can resolve features as small as 600 feet across in the terraced walls of the crater, and the hummock-like blanket of material blasted out by the meteor impact."

The Lem is a bit smaller.

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This is a still that he is rotating/zooming in and out of, in post production(?) Which would mean that the shimmering effect is being added to simulate the atmospheric shimmering of a live shot(?) (The constant rotation/zoom pattern gets just a little annoying after a bit.)

Shadow of what? (So, that was added also?)

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The video claims a sensor and diffraction limited resolution of 1 km at the moon (with a severe crop). Hubble gets a resolution closer to 0.2 km. (600 ft)

This program is capable of 0.5m resolution, though most of the survey work was done at the 100 m level.

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This is a video with zooms and whatnot added in post. I’m guessing the atmospheric shimmering is real.

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I don’t know what the shadow is but it’s probably just aliens.

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Well, if the silhouette is of something in orbit around the earth, then we can use the video of the shadow crossing the face of the moon to calculate the angular velocity of the object and thereby its altitude. We can also approximately measure the angular width of the object and from knowing the altitude we can calculate the objects dimensions. From that we could narrow down what satellite it could be, if it is a satellite.

For reference, the distance from the earth to the moon is 384,400 km.

Quick back of the envelope indicates it isn’t a satellite. Probably a high-flying bird.

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Sure. Real believable. Wake up

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Birds aren’t real. But I agree with you.

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I suppose you want me to believe in the moon too?

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