1964 racists complaining about the Civil Rights Act sound like 2021 racists complaining about #BLM

Originally published at: 1964 racists complaining about the Civil Rights Act sound like 2021 racists complaining about #BLM | Boing Boing

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One of the frustrating parts is that so many of today’s racists pretend that they would have been on the right side of history had they been around during the Civil Rights movement of 1960s when they absolutely, positively would not have been.

Just like many of those racists of the 1960s probably convinced themselves that they would have opposed slavery if they’d been around during the Civil War.

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How much you want to bet that boy and girl now complain about how terrible BLM is?

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Change BAD!

Why can’t we go back to the time when I assumed everything was OK. And especially the time when it was good for me the most!

:man_facepalming:

Every time we try to address some flaw in our society, be a it small one or a great injustice perpetrated on a people for hundreds of years, we have some broad push back against addressing it. Some people deny that it exists. Some people argue the semantics of it not really being a negative but there are some advantages too (yea, wtf). Some people are violent racist bigots ready to commit genocide. It’s no wonder that some black people think all white people are working against them, in some ways it’s true.

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New Title: Vintage White Privilege

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Well, at least they asked black people how they felt about if for balance.

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Its also been anti-gay bigots trying to enact Jim Crow 2.0 since Obergfell.
“Freedom of Association means I don’t have to serve those kind of people”
“My religion says those people are my inferiors, their rights do not matter”
“Their marriage is an abomination!”
“I don’t want their kids in the same school as mine!”

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Just like there were far more people saying they were part of the French Resistance in 1946 than there were in 1944.

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Ah, a '64… nutty flavor with bitter overtones and absolutely no notes of dark chocolate.

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2015-06-13-411

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Well, we keep finding the ones who are convinced that slavery wasn’t bad at all…

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But that’s because Black Lives Matter is not a new thing, but an extension of what happened 60 years ago.

The issue isn’t really.beatings and killings by cops, it’s that cops see “different” and then it’s acceptable to mistreat people. The beatings and killings are just the tip of the iceberg, it starts when people are stopped for no good reason.

I can’t blame racism on all the times I got stopoed while walking, stwrting in 1976. But it made me notice when there’d be stories about Black people having trouble with cops (and usually because those people made a point of going to the press).

I bought a copy of the criminal code after reading a book by Huey Newton where he mentions the Black Panthers did it. in 1986 when tge Quebec Human Rights Commission had hearings on racial profiling, I wrote about my experiences, outright saying “if it happens to me, of course it happens” and tried to convey what it felt like to be stopped for no reason, and to be sworn at, illegally searched, and threatened with a beating.

I saw the left not being concerned about these things. Sure, a hatred of cops, but an ideological issue, rather than personal.

Student kids stomping around in 2012 and then claiming police abuse, when it’s a whole lot different when it happens alone for no reason. And I remember some Black leader in a tiny story saying “we were going to have a demonstration, but not in this atmosphere”. I think it was about the killing of Treyvon Martin.

I’ve even seen recent stories where “police brutality” is used, as if that’s the issue. It’s easy to embrace being against bestings or being for hatred of cops, it’s harder to see the underlying racism, abd that it’s not something someone else needs to fix.

This isn’t about people who spew hate, it’s about all the things we do that seem fine, until we change and then are so embarrassed that we don’t mention it.

I remember about thirty years ago and started to avoid a seat next to a Black woman, under some guise that she wouldn’t want me there. And I realized that was me, not her. So I sat there, and it made all the difference in the world.

Racism isn’t about how it happens, it’s about how some people hurt, and are defined by others. That has to be primary, their voices, not ours always speaking.

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Well, one thing has changed since then: Racists on the street in 2020/21 have no hesitation to share their thoughts “on the air.”

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salute

Genius.

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Um…

YES, IT FUCKING IS.

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But also the beatings and the killings.

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“they have just as much opportunity as anybody… in that part of town…”

astounding

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“They have the same opportunity to work and build their part of the town up, just the same as we have.”

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and that is how I, personally, solved police brutality

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Thank you for posting a prime example of what happens when Black people stay to themselves and try to build up our own communities.

See also Rosewood, FL and the Red Summer of 1919.

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