A million anti-Net Neutrality comments reportedly fake


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/11/27/a-million-anti-net-neutrality.html


#2

This just shows that computers don’t support Net Neutrality!


#3

What about all the comments entered by illegals? I have been told by my golf buddy that there could be millions of them!!! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#4

It’s the typical response from American conservatives and shady corporations who fear they won’t get their way: cheat and deny reality. Now they’re automating the process.


#5

So [Past Tense Verb, Indicating Surprise]! I mean, [Exclamation of Surprise], who would have thought that these [Adjective Indicating Trust] companies and politicians would ever dream of [Past Tense Verb, Indicating Falsification] comments!

[Kevin, don’t screw up again, remember to replace the boxes this time, you jackass - Mgmt]


#6

I think you should loose your golf buddy in a sand-trap.


#7

So the question is: who is actually responsible for them? Someone unleashed the bots, and somehow I don’t see Russian hackers being involved (although it is yet another way to undermine American democracy). Someone needs to be named and shamed, at the very least.


#8

I’ve noticed on almost every forum where some article/posting referred to NN that a sudden influx of commenters terribly worried about ‘property rights’ etc appear and just shut down everything by sheer volume of blather.


#9

Only a million? What’s that cost these days, like 400 rubles?


#10

Remember, none of this matters because the FCC has already moved the goalposts.

But even ignoring the potential spam, the commission said it didn’t really care about the public’s opinion on net neutrality unless it was phrased in unique legal terms. The vast majority of the 22 million comments were form letters, the official said, and unless those letters introduced new facts into the record or made serious legal arguments, they didn’t have much bearing on the decision. The commission didn’t care about comments that were only stating opinion.


#11

Russia?

Mueller… Mueller… Mueller…


#12

Moving the goalposts is right. Why even ask for public comment if the only argument you’ll accept is a formal letter from a lawyer? They’re almost literally saying “Fuck all of you, come back with a warrant.”


#13

I don’t understand these claims. Maybe I’m missing something.

What are all the services that these people and their bots feel they can’t access due to this alleged bureaucratic rigging of the current setup?


#14

They always did prefer to have minions do their bidding


#15

Trebuchet recommended


#16

That’s what minions are for.

:wink:


#17

What else would one expect in a fake democracy if not a fake democratic process corrupted by monied interests? (Sorry not sorry for the excessive cynicism but, you know, facts.)


#18

Fuck these filthy fucking fucks, with a brick.


#19

The one thing that has me somewhat puzzled is that they would bother at all, and potentially risk a ‘Comcast consultants spam FCC’ type story, when Mr. Pai had made it abundantly clear that his position isn’t exactly going to be swayed by public comment.

That sort of spamming is likely not that expensive (even if you don’t have a free-as-in-stolen botnet); but it’s enough of a project that it would leave an organizational trail(if only the invoices from a PR firm for services rendered); which suggests that either some Telco was worried enough to go to the trouble of muddying the waters, or that some “anti-collectivist” keyboard warrior was motivated to conduct a campaign on his own(one ucnharacteristically low on trolling for such endeavors).

Just seems weird. Pain was clearly willing to go ahead, who was still worried; and what were they worried about?


#20

I think it was a combination of arrogance (“we won’t get caught”), arse covering, and keeping up appearances. Typical behaviour from the kind of executives who’d thrive at a company like Comcast or AT&T.