Amazing drum-solo


#1

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#2

So, why is this so amusing whenever you look at folks like the Rolling Stones’ drummer, who is probably way older than this person, and still doing a fantastic job?


#3

See?

To drum solo.


#4

Yeah, well even as a young man, Charlie Watts often got kicked to the curb during the actual studio recording sessions. Rumor has it that he couldn’t quite pull off the fill on “Lovin’ Cup.”


#5

awwww yis! better than Church Lady!


#6

One imagines she has given that demonstration to classes full of surprised adolescents for years. She looks to be pretty “with it” as we used to say.


#7

#8

Came to see Grandma drop the sticks at the end of her solo. Slightly disappointed not to see anyone get served, but I guess it’s way better than a 10 minute drum solo!


#9

In a related vein, I still love John Lennon’s comment about Ringo, saying he wasn’t even the best drummer in the Beatles.


#10

Am I the only one who thinks drum solos have some sort of relativistic effect? Time just seems to slow right down.


#11

I think you’re mistaken “amusing” for amazing.

The Stones’ drummer has been famous as a drummer all his life. When we see him perform what is, really, a feat of physical dexterity and stamina as well as musical virtuosity, we superimpose upon him the image of all those young men and incrementally older men we’ve seen him as over the years.

Human perception is only sensitive to differences, not absolutes. Gradual change does not strike us as remarkable, even if, gradually and over time, great change is effected.

On the other hand, due to the sheer physicality of drumming, the majority of drummers we’ve seen in our days are young. At 42, I struggle with physical tasks that were easier when I was 18. This process will not reverse itself.

Projected on our minds’ cave-walls, then, when we picture a “typical” drummer, is a young person. When this amazing woman walks into frame, she is vastly different from that picture. Our sensitivity to relative differences is triggered by that wide gap, causing a moment of delightful surprise.

A person who has grown old without losing the stamina and dexterity necessary to accomplish the virtuoso sprint represented by a drum solo isn’t a figure of fun, she is a figure of inspiration. She is a reminder to all of us that artistic talent and physical ability can be decoupled, but that artists who are lucky and who are diligent and who are clever can find ways around the insults of age to accomplish feats that shame youth.

As Ciardi wrote: “The old crow is getting slow/the young crow is not… The only thing the young crow does not know/Is where to go.”


#12

It’s actually a sloppy solo by someone who lost her fastball years ago. Forgive me for being ungracious, but I think people are impressed simply because she looks old for 63. Come by 19 Broadway, in Fairfax, on the first Sunday of any month, and watch a bunch of geezers who can still play.

And by the way, Charlie Watts has a far more solid groove than most drummers half his age. At this point the Rolling Stones are actually Charlie, Mick, Chuck and Darryl. The guitarists have been phoning it in for years.


#13

Who said it was “amusing”? Fuck whoever said that. This lady is an inspiration to anyone who’s not as young as they used to be and fears becoming lame and irrelevant. I aspire to be half as cool when I’m 63.


#14

Gotta agree with slideguy: if this were a man of the same apparent age, it would be slightly embarrassing, and the people running the shop would probably ask him to stop. She’s not that good, especially for someone who apparently used to play regularly.


#15

Her entire approach is, “Oh yeah, I don’t really do this anymore except to show off, but here you go.” and then she plays totally relaxed and just knockin it out. Running through her routine and just for a laugh, cause the kids asked. She looks like a cool lady. She is not showing off.


#16

I’ve seen the Stones perform live once and I have to say Charlie Watts kind of sucks. He’s amusing, not amazing. But that’s pretty much my opinion on the Stones as well.


#17

The woman could obviously once play. Unfortunately a steady tempo doesn’t seem something she retains, this solo is sloppy.

This guy on the otherhand has ten years on her and manages to both look and sound like he’s got a built in metronome.


#18

This is the one that really blew me away.


Dave Weckl, Vinnie Colaiuta, Steve Gadd


#19

“On the other hand, due to the sheer physicality of drumming, the
majority of drummers we’ve seen in our days are young.”

The “sheer physicality” of drumming has nothing to do with this. It’s the bias towards young musicians that permeates our culture nowadays. When you picture a musician, do you picture someone in their 50s, 60s, 70s or older? I’d guess not.

“She is a reminder to all of us that artistic talent and physical
ability can be decoupled, but that artists who are lucky and who are
diligent and who are clever can find ways around the insults of age to
accomplish feats that shame youth.”

Sad that we need this reminder, but so it goes.


closed #20

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