Amazon's facial recognition fear crusade ramps up: now they're paying Facebook to show you pictures of suspected criminals to scare you into getting a surveillance doorbell

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/06/07/fear-sells.html

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Bezos & Zuckerberg, a match made in heaven.

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Would someone with mad photoshop skillz like to do the honours?

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ReKKKognition

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I mean they can certainly try, by all means spend your money to try to get me to buy a voice assistance, a Nest, etc because i have zero interest in buying any connected service. That said i do know people who have fears in regards to their privacy yet they still have these kinds of services at home and it makes me sad.

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In unrelated news, Microsoft updated the terms of their Photo app:

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From the link at the bottom of the original post:

Ring is also using the image of a woman who is innocent until proven guilty and calling her a thief in ad that it’s paying to get in front of a targeted audience in order to sell more home surveillance equipment. The company doesn’t claim to know for certain that she’s committed a crime, and the police have yet to catch or convict anyone on this case.

How long until people start trolling it, letting themselves be recorded while “stealing” their own things, to sue amazon and the neighborhoods later?
Any volunteers?

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Wow. That little line about “you represent that you have all appropriate consents from the people in your photos and videos” is a minefield. I have no idea how MS think that anybody in the world could “accept” that condition; I presume that their argument is that they aren’t responsible for the people who click “accept” without understanding what that means.

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The next screen, after I declined, is an “Are you sure?” (only complicated) where the buttons don’t match the question.

I have the feeling that they want a CYA release for more than just processing the images on their cloud.

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What a shit show.

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I own no such IoT gadgets either, but I’m curious as to how these devices differ from the phones that nearly all of us carry from a security perspective. Seems like both are equally potent open doors.

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Am I the only one wondering why I should give a damn?

I remember chilling on the sidewalk on mission street in Santa Barbara late 1993 outside of a club at night with my new buddies two months after coming from Germany to study. Suddenly I get pushed to the ground by one of my mates bodyguard-style … He noticed a red dot moving up my face and his first thought was “Laser-Pointer”. He came from LA and sat to my left.
The guy to my right was French, and saw a red light/spill originating from the club that moved up my face.

Feel free to change ‘red dot’ with ‘suspected criminal’, or respectively ‘light spill’ with ‘portraits’ …

Cell phones aren’t much better but iot devices are always on listening and honestly that scares me more than someone looking at my stupid random Google searches

My phone listens in exactly the same way as my google home device.

Only if you have such features enabled, which I don’t

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