An epic chart comparing every science fiction spaceship ever


#1

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#2

Bury the lead! Awesome graphic but, the headline: 99% OF ALL SPACESHIPS IMAGINED AS STREAMLINED PHALLUS - SPACE STILL A VACUUM (WE’RE PRETTY SURE)


#3

Q: Why isn’t the Death Star/CSO Carrier/V’Ger/other large ship on the chart?
A: For reasons of image quality and chart organisation, only ships between
a minimum of 100 meters and 24000 meters are applicable for this chart,
sorry. Arbitrary? Yes! But I had to draw the line somewhere.

Okay, so it doesn’t include the weaponized planets from the later Lensman novels…

I would like to see a similar chart [or series for charts for different size classes] for classic and pulp sf.


#4

Still no Death Star.


#5

For the size queens among us, http://Merzo.net has got the best range of scale. It hasn’t been updated for a while, but it covers the basics. If you have internet explorer installed, you can even move the models around on the page for more specific comparisons!


#6

It’ll be a really really big chart. Sam Lundwall’s Refanut was 20,000 miles long.


#7

Very disappointed to see the T.A.R.D.I.S. left off. It more than meets the minimum size…on the inside.


#8

That’s where all these ships are parked, silly.


#9

Is the garage left or right from the swimming pool? I always get turned round.


#10

Well, you don’t have to bother about aerodynamics, but you still have the pesky issues of load bearing in the directions of highest load; a stick shape is still one of the best choices when you have to accelerate/decelerate with mass-driver engines. Then there’s the issue of small cross-section of the front during the flight, due to the minuscule but still significant amount of matter in space, and possibly of opening portals/passageways in the fabric of the universe.

Plus there’s the issue that you want the engines/reactors/power cores as far away from the living quarters as possible due to stray radiation.

And, in orbit, you want to be facing front-down, due to visibility from below; you want the least cross-section for sensors. That said, most of the ships will be awfully visible (you want dull black for visible light, low emissivity for infrared, and low RCS for radars); maybe the contradictory requirements led the designers to give up.


#11

Seriously? What is this, recycle Boing Boing day?


#12

This guy has been compiling this chart for a long time. I have copies saved from like 15 years ago or something.


#13

If they repost this every year or so from now until the end of time, I’d be okay with that.


#14

Yep, and still no Cetacean/Whale Probe from The Voyage Home.


#15

Anyone else remember that old SNL sketch “Planet of the Men vs. Planet of the Women”?


#16

He’s not done, of course. Somewhere a Culture GSV laughs momentarily as it remembers the lone Citizen left on Earth performing penal observation duty. That citizen is right now in a room at some generic Hilton composing an observational report for upload out through the solar-system-wide quarantine field. Close at hand on the minibar is a delightful meat stew made from vat-grown Idi Amin and displaced down to the room on an automated schedule.

Would the appropriate entry into this chart be the moon-sized GSV as it cavorts near the galactic core or a bare caption noting the dimensional nowhereness in which its presence resides when it visits Earth?


#17

We definitely need more of the saucers that they had in the good old days.


#18

OK guys, where’s Mals Serenity??? I don’t see any mid-bulk freighters in there.


#19

I was thinking this had been around the block a few times.


#20

Ok, so where’s the waffle iron from Hardware Wars?