Another Anti-Vax GOP "leader" says dumb things in California


#1

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#2

It’s a real shame this is about communicable diseases. Otherwise I’d be happy to let natural selection do its thing.


#3

She sounds like she needs some calibration: the accepted dog-whistle for demolishing-science-while-pretending-to-support-it is “Sound Science”. That’s the one you see any time a little ‘uncertainty’ needs to exist in order to forestall some tedious and expensive environmental regulation or the like.

“Sound Data” is either a mutant strain, or this one can’t deliver her lines quite right. I’ll have to keep an eye out for other instances.


#4

Meanwhile in Europe…

A single case of diphtheria in Spain (the first one in 30 years) sparks a nationwide vaccination movement.


#5

If Spain can remember the diphtheria outbreak that spawned the Iditarod Dog Sled Race, why can’t we?


#6

This is why we can’t have a nice country…


#7

If you search the anti-GMO sites, it’s pretty hard to find one that is not also anti-vaxxer. Anti-GMO people make a big deal of being offended when people say they are also anti-vaxxers, but the sites seem to indicate there is a pretty broad overlap. Certainly the themes and psychology of conspiracies, martyrdom, saving their children, and bearing the burden of being The Smartest Guy In The Room all overlap.


#8

They did have that brouhaha with the flu back in 1918.

At least they learn from their lessons…


#9

It’s a one-way overlap AFAICT. Anti-vaxxers are almost universally anti-GMO, but they’re only a small subset (of a group more accurately described as “GMO-wary,” btw.) You don’t think the European Union is anti-vaccination, do you?


#10

And again, people like this refer to the notion of “parental rights”. Parents have no rights with respect to their children, they have only responsibilities.


#11

It would be interesting to compare the EU and the US, because in the US the number of anti-GMO activists is much much smaller. In the US, there seems to be a community driven by generic fud and woo that supports overlapping beliefs. The number of activists on similar issues seems larger than they really are because on the various issues it’s the same people popping up over and over again. I think a lot of this is rooted in the animal rights movement and traditional medical quackery combining various ideological beliefs such as animal research (vaccines) doesn’t apply to humans and that homeopathy plus organic food make you immortal anyway. Vaccines and GMOs are just part of the dog’s breakfast that aren’t subject to any level of rational thought… I think many anti-GMO activists have transitioned from anti-vax to anti-GMO publicly while remaining closet anti-vaxxers. Also, see how many of these anti-vaxxer + anti-GMO sites now say that “GMOs cause autism.” Yes, it’s convenient to just change one word of the pitch, but they are targeting the same audience. They are not saying “GMOs cause baldness” to reach a new audience, they are saying “Vaccines GMOs cause autism” in order to target that same anti-vaxxer audience.

Meanwhile on the conservative end of the spectrum some antivaxxers are part of the general conspiracy theory subculture (chemtrails, UN invasions etc). And in the US medical quackery has deep roots going back to the 19th century and a lot of sexual hysteria.
http://christiansandsolosex.com/history/19thcentury.html


#12

In America it seems a broadly anti-fact movement


#13

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