Another Great Pyrenees rescue story


#1

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#2

I prefer the Great Grand Canyon Rescue episode.


#3

Pyrs are such incredible dogs, I fell in love with them via the French language Belle & Sebastian show I watched as a kid. I really wish I had the space for one and they are definitely not a dog for just anyone.


#4

Out of curiosity, do you mean the original 1960s live action series, or the french version of the 80s anime adaptation?

Both are great, I feel, but the second one puts me in mind of Azumanga Daioh, and the venerable Tadakichi-san.


#5

That last sentence before "Read the Rest" sure turns clicking it into a bit of a dare...


#6

I've always been a very vocal supporter of, and the proud participant in rescue orgs, whether they are local shelters or breed specific.
I'm sure those who speak to me about getting a pup are tired of my rants against breeders and/or puppy mills. This is not to say that all breeders are bad, but there are so many great dogs in need of a home, pure bred or the majestic mutt.
And yes, my av is my latest rescue. She's a grand Black and Tan Coonhound that chose me when I visited a local shelter after the passing of my previous rescue hound.


#7

I second your comment. There's a rescue group for every breed if you want to get a specific one. I found mine on Petfinder. She's (my avatar) a Treeing Walker Hound found at a county dump several hundred miles away from her new home. Kudos for the regular support here for the Pyr rescue group.


#8

If you live in Ohio (or even if you don't), please consider supporting the Animal Cruelty Task Force of Ohio

"It is our goal to work with County Humane Societies and, in accordance with the Ohio Revised Code, equip, train and pay for competent Humane Agents who can properly enforce the laws in their County. "


#9

I agree. My dog is a rescue, and he is awesome. I was very lucky, as I got him from a shelter several states away based on a few descriptions, photos, and a short video.

But if you're new to dog ownership, and don't know what you're getting yourself into, rescues come with a different set of challenges than puppies. On the one hand, they're likely already housebroken. On the other, older dogs can be harder to train, and dogs with a history of abuse can have all sorts of ingrained behavior issues that can take months or years to sort out. And while there are plenty of rescues and more people should rescue, at the end of the day new dogs have to come from somewhere. So rescue if you can, and choose your breeder carefully otherwise.


#10

The French show from the 60's (I'm old).


#11

I agree to a certain extent. Yes, rescues present challenges but I don't completely agree that their history is any more of a challenge than having a healthy, happy pup grow to a happy, well adjusted adult.
Whether a pup or an adult rescue, of course proper and knowledgeable vetting is key. Unfortunately, not everyone will take the time or have the forethought to take that approach.
I follow the line of thought that first and foremost there are two basic requirements that need to be met:
1)The need to have a well defined place in the pack and 2) the needs of the breed.
Too many people are ignorant of one or the other and it's usually the dog that ends up paying the price.


#12

Agreed 100% on both (1) and (2)


#13

I don't understand the practice of going to extreme effort and expense to rescue animals in very bad shape while healthy pets are being euthanized daily. If the motivation is the welfare of the animals, why not use the resources to rescue hundreds of healthy animals that would otherwise be killed, just because no one wants them, or do education and intervention to reduce the number of animal horror situations, rather than incur "outrageous" vet bills for uncertain outcomes for a few animals?

I just looked at the Humane Society, and they say there are 2.7 million healthy unwanted pets each year. I guess animal rescue is not motivated primarily by utilitarian concerns. Still, it seems hard to justify all those resources to save an animal, when practically next door animals with no such problems are being put to sleep for a lack of a better way to deal with them.

I guess I'm bomb-throwing in this thread when it's almost closed - sorry! I've had it in mind all week. Start a new thread about it if you need to set me straight.


#14

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