As social media centralized, blogging's core infrastructure has withered


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/08/11/as-social-media-centralized-b.html


#2

As social media centralized, blogging’s core infrastructure has withered

[note sarcasm & schadenfreude]


#3

looks to me like natural selection has done it’s thing. successes continue and failures fall to the side. just because you have a great product does no entitle you to continue. running an online business isn’t just about the product.


#4

I really don’t get why he thinks pingbacks/trackbacks are gone; I still get them and send them.

The same goes for a lot of the n/a’s on the second list.


#5

Okay, I went and read the OP. The guy is at least half-wrong on everything he says. I still use a bunch of the features which he claims no longer exist, and I use them on my self-hosted WP blog.

Closed platform, my ass.


#6

Roger That!


#7

Interesting blogs outside big media still exist but the olden days were more like a bunch of scattered hamlets on an incomplete map, now it’s more big cities and suburbs.


#8

I’ve been blogging since 2008. #1 thing that makes people abandon blogs? They have nothing to say. It’s like how loads of people were on Geocities and Angelfyre until they figured out they didn’t want to maintain a Web site.

The nastiest thing about social media platforms (and no, I do not include blogs as “social media” – people blog to blog first and interact second) us that they allow, even encourage, reposting other people’s content verbatim. It can be a good tool, but it also discourages users from learning how to come up with their own content.


#9

Usenet forever!


#10

Long live RSS!


#11

“they allow, even encourage, reposting other people’s content verbatim”

I wouldn’t call this nasty, but it is a weakness. it encourages copying rather than original creation.


#12

Strange… I’m still using blogger.


#13

Not to mention…linking. (What is this web thingy?)

Years ago, I had to advise businessmen about their websites. Inevitably, they would ask me to find articles about (insert topic here) that they could cut and paste on their website (for SEO purposes). I would try to explain that that’s not how this works. Even if the search engines didn’t ban them for duplicate content, anyone who found them would click away since it was just a duplicate of no value. They should instead write up a reply to the article, link it, quote it, but add some original content. That was too much work. They had nothing to add to the conversation.

Thanks to people like them, our internet is now clogged with garbage retweets and reblogs and such. It’s useless noise of no value. Those are features that social media should eliminate.


#14

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