At a Chinese cemetery, scientists discover some of the oldest evidence of pot smoking

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/06/12/at-a-chinese-cemetery-scienti.html

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It’s likely that they were trying to communicate with spirits.

Ooooor it was just a bunch of kids, who preferred to get ripped at the cemetery because no one ever bothered them there.

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Been there and done that… a few times.

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Archeologist 1: “This ancient practice involved mind-bending drugs. Any idea as to why they engaged in this?”

Archeologist 2: “Not an inkling! Zip! Bupkis! But we’re the experts, so “we have absolutely no idea” isn’t in the cards.”

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“funerary rites that included flames, rhythmic music, and hallucinogen smoke, all intended to guide people into an altered state of mind”

Is one of the most metal pull-quotes I’ve ever read.

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And all of the people that were there are dead now WE OWE THAT LOUISIANA CORONER AN APOLOGY

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Outside agitators

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Never guess what I’m doing right now?

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I hope you’re heating rocks!

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No, you got that wrong.

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Box,” not “rocks.”

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Sure, sure, they only ate the seeds. Yup.
Then they burned the evidence.

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Ritual is one of archaeologist’s stock answers for anything not understood.

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Ritual is an archeologist’s standard ‘excuse’ for our ancestors getting high. Because getting high apparently sounds much too unscientific in peer reviewed publications. Unless it’s alcohol, then it’s OK. Almost says as much about us then it does about our ancestors: apparently our rituals prohibit us from talking about getting high in scientific publications.

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This “Chinese” Graveyard is in the west of the Xinjiang Uygur “Autonomous” Region, thousands of miles west of the great wall. (Walls don’t work.)
The native inhabitants, the Uygurs, a Turkic people, largely resent the ongoing occupation by China and their being replaced with Han.
The people buried there are not Turkic either, because those only made it there around the year 842.
That set of paraphernalia most likely belonged to some Tocharian or Kushan folks. Indo-Europeans.

Just saying. Because calling this a Chinese graveyard is like calling a millennia old Samoan archaeological site an American graveyard.

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It is also used for the disposal of broken swords, some walkways and tying victims to hurdles.

A bunch of pre-bong-age savages.

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