Baltimore police respond to report they secretly spied on city with aerial surveillance tech from Iraq War


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/08/24/baltimore-police-respond-to-re.html


#2

where the h*ll do they get the money for all these gadgets?


#3


#4

Said no politician, ever.


#5

Don’t you mean “H-E-double hockey sticks”?


#6

Land of the Brave. Home of the free?

H-E-Fucking-double hockey sticks!


#7

Is this the project Angelfire? - taking a relatively low res photo every few seconds. It was on the Note to Self or Radiolab last year, by taking pictures every few seconds when something happened like a cartel hit on a prosecutor in Juarez Mexio - they were able to go back and find out where they came from or went to. Or after and IED went off they were able to backtrack and find out who put it there.


#8

I am concerned that the “anonymous donor” is the supplier of the technology and will cash in big time when the mass surveillance is widely adopted.


#9

Dunno who built this one, but if anyone cares, MIT-Lincoln Labs, Lexington MA, developed a gigapixel realtime camera for this sort of platform (plus object tracking software).
Just in case you felt like picketing somewhere.


#10

What the actual fuck?

Edit to clarify: what could possibly go wrong when you outsource police work to anonymous third parties? :unamused:


#11

The fuzz gets busted when the fog rolls in.


#12

“Drop those hockey sticks, citizen. And pick up that can.”


#13

Same creepy company that was on Radiolab a while back. They definitely have surveillance footage of the Freddie Gray ride, if they are operating in Baltimore they way that was described.


#14

Civil forfeiture.


#15

“This isn’t surveilling or tracking anyone. It’s about catching those who choose to do harm to citizens in our city.”

This, people, is Newspeak.


#16

I can’t think of any other reason someone would donate money for this. Seriously.


#17

…and the ratchet clicks just one notch tighter. Eventually the justified shootings will come from the sky, and we will be assured that these new powers won’t ever be abused.

Skynet is here, we just haven’t noticed.


#18

[snark]Technically, they’re right. They aren’t surveilling or tracking anyone, they’re surveilling and tracking everyone.[/snark]

The obfuscation in the bit you quote is sickening. How do they imagine achieving the second sentence using this technology without conducting the first sentence. If it isn’t surveillance or tracking, why is the video being kept indefinitely. :mad: I don’t live in Baltimore, but Baltimore will not be the last place this is deployed.


#19

Yeah it was on Radiolab. Amazing tech. Terrifying, amazing tech.

Hard to criticise it’s use in war zones, it seems incredibly invasive in a civillian setting.

The Juarez use case was amazing though, for those who haven’t seen it, the prosecutor (I thought she was a police officer?) was driving to work, a car pulled in front and blocked her path, another car boxed her in, cartel gunmen leaped out and executed her in the street, then drove away.

After the crime was reported, they were able to identify the vehicles, see where they had come from and where they went, they identified a senior member of the cartel with this process.

It is compelling stuff and I can see how law enforcement would be easily seduced by it.

The implications for privacy when this tech is applied to civilians without oversight are truly dystopian though.


#20

Baltimore police spokesman T.J. Smith today said not to worry unless you’re a “criminal…”

…or anybody with Fourth Amendment rights.