British Brexiters shocked to find out they might have to get permission to travel to Europe


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/09/13/british-brexiters-shocked-to-f.html


#2

The irony here is beyond belief.


#3

They can always have a lovely staycation at the sunny beaches of the UK… oh wait…


#4

There is only one reasonable answer. The English realm will have to reassert its trans-channel claims!


#5

I’m emphatically a Remain person, but this issue is being overhyped.

The Grauniad article pointlessly likens a Nigerian wanting to obtain a full EU visa to a Brit wanting to use the EU’s visa-waiver scheme.
The latter is proposed to mirror the USA’s existing ESTA scheme, whereby one completes a basic online application, pays a fee ($10ish) then is precleared for access to the USA for two years. No documents to submit to an embassy, no need to take time off work. And no ‘per trip’ fee, contrary to other scare stories peddled by the media/commentariat.

But yes, fully deserved by Brexiters. My schadenfreude would only be greater if they weren’t dragging me down with them…

[Sorry; didn’t intend that to be a direct reply to Papasan]


#6

It is time for King Arthur to wake from his centuries-long sleep and re-conquer Europe from Scandinavia to Rome!


#7

Amazing!! Doing something has consequences! How could the Brexiters have known?!?

This same type of thing is playing out in North Carolina. They are losing tons of money due to the bathroom law and some of them seem shocked by this! I guess they figured that Jebus would bless them for sticking their noses in other people’s business.


#8

The Once and Future King!

Ruuuule Britania… Wait…
-checks DNA -
Oh, Shite, that’s right, I’m Irish, erm…


#9

Methinks someone is hoping Mallorca may get less crowded. Well, there’s always the Germans to pick up the slack.


#10

Reminds me of the Quebec separatist movement in the '90s, which kept making statements about how things would work after separation without mentioning that most of it would require negotiations with the Government of Canada.


#11

I think he’ll be too busy driving the English-supremacists into the sea to worry about anyone else.

Do the British Nazi Party and their spin-offs still claim that the English are the indigenous population of Britain? Because’s they’re obviously wrong. I don’t know about the river names, which tend to trace older languages, but the tribal names of pre-Roman Britain aren’t Germanic. I wouldn’t be surprised if they are simply Celtic. (Even when they since been taken up by speakers of Germanic, as with Kent.)


#12

Actually, this might actually help places like Brighton and Blackpool. Maybe they aren’t as “sunny” as Spain, but you can see a traditional Punch and Judy show on the beach, so…


#13

I do suspect this will be the case, people will find ways to make the best out of the situation and explore the UK a bit more. Having never had to take out a visa to travel i’m a bit mystified by the process but it seems to be quite a hassle to my family members that do need them.


#14

I keep being reminded of this:


#15

People who have not lived or worked overseas often have strange ideas about international mobility - which I suspect lies at the root of their confusion about how easy it is for “foreigners” and refugees to simply move to US/UK/Australia/Canada etc.

As somebody who has lived and worked in 5 different countries overseas from the country of my passport and has lived overseas for all my adult life and for longer than I lived in my “home” country, I am well aware of the multiple levels of bullshit, officialdom, and bureaucracy that expats have to deal with. And I say that as someone who plays at the easiest level - a highly educated white professional male who speaks multiple languages. If I have trouble filling out the forms (and I do) imagine how difficult it is for someone for whom English (or Spanish or Italian) is their second or third language and who has limited formal education.

Related: I always find it really amusing when Americans or Brits say they’ll “move to Canada or New Zealand or wherever” if a certain politician is elected. They never consider if Canada or New Zealand will actually allow them to do so.


#16

If I’ve decided it’s time to pack my bags and leave the U.S., it’s because I fear some seriously major awful stuff is about to go down. The last place I want to be is North America when that happens. And if I want to stay in refuge, I wouldn’t want to be anywhere where the paperwork on foreigners is scrupulous. That eliminates Europe and Oceania.


#17

I’ve travelled a lot - if I had my life to start again (i.e. I was 20 rather than 50 now), I’d be heading to South America. I know that Asia is usually the first choice of expats, but there always to something a little unsavory about the white folks who end up living in Vietnam or Thailand (or maybe that’s just my biases showing). Southern Argentina or Chile are wide open spaces waiting to be discovered. Of course those countries have had their own experience with various Caudillos over the years, but in my (limited) experience it seems to affect most rural people very little.

Good Luck


#18

Don’t count out Eastern Europe. I spent a few summer months in Moldova and Ukraine (the west side of the sea), and it was really quite decent.


#19

It’s telling that citizens of Central and South America countries are already empathizing with those of us in the U.S. who are biting away at our cuticles now that a culture of Trumpismo is a plausible future for the nation.


#20

Well, there were other places they could’ve stayed near the beach outside of the UK, but local officials may not want them to stay very long…