Burberry announces new rainbow flag plaid and support for LGBTQ charities


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/02/13/burberry-announces-new-rainbow.html


#2

very nice idea, but if that’s the plaid, it’s kinda ugly…


#3

I prefer my FC St Pauli 2015-16 away shirt.

I don’t have the Rayo Vallecano away shirt from the same season, but I want one too.

Both teams are well known for having left wing supporters.

(I don’t know why I replied to @Yri. Sorry.)


#4

Obligatory Spaceballs reference. “They’ve gone to plaid”


#5

I assume they are trying to match it to their plaid:


Rather than make a novel plaid starting with the rainbow pattern.


#6

It’s just a visual play on their aggressively trademark-protected (but often copied) plaid.

In fact, it’s part of a larger narrative at Burberry, where their IP became so damaged by knockoff fakes (and, for a while, a popular association with British “chav” culture) that they had backed way the hell off that plaid for a decade or more, and it was only brought back recently, in the September 2017 fashion shows. The creative director is clearly trying to bring it back, make it new, and make it, uh, “relevant” I guess. I applaud the attempt, at least.


#7

I wonder how it’ll sell in China, which makes up a large portion of Burberry’s sales, but where LGBT issues are fraught to say the least.


#8

I wondered if this might have been an attempt to push the brand further from that sort of association in the minds of the public (and possibly an attempt to rid themselves of that unwanted fanbase at the same time.).


#9

While risking the Chinese market? I dunno about that.

I think it really depends on whether the rainbow check gets marketed as a limited-edition special PR charity gimmick (in which case yes, the PR benefit would be at least partly what you describe), or as a mass-market thing [“mass market” by Burberry standards, that is], in which case Burberry may really have a problem selling it in their Chinese, Russian, and Arab markets.


#10

no prob; nice jerseys!


#11

oh, that asplains it. thx


#12

Nie wieder Krieg, nie wieder Faschismus, nie wieder 3. Liga!


#13

Unless someone with access to a media platform chooses to make a big deal about it in China, it will fly right under the radar. Rainbow flags don’t seem to have caught on as a symbol for LGBT in China.


#14

Being able to safely publicly state your opinion doesn’t seem to have caught on in China.


#15

Perhaps I was unclear above. What I meant is that very few are likely to catch on that this plaid has any connection to non-heterosexuality. It’s not a commonly known symbol in China.


#16

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