Canada and Mexico get serious about ending weed prohibition


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Definitely Canada.

But Mexico could use it the most.


#3

Follow the money


#4

LET MY PEOPLE GROW!

thanks


#5

never ever EVER drink the bong water. sheesh. I would have said, “wake up and drink the bhang water”, maybe.


#6

I have already read WSJ comments claiming that it is the baby-hating weed epidemic that is causing the US economy to slow down.


#7

When will the U.S. government wake up and drink the bong water like their neighbors?

Dude, I get that you’re trying to make a hip-sounding reference to the 1978 mass suicide in Guyana. And how “drinking the Kool-Aid” has become ironic euphamism for doing something completely sensible despite what a bunch of old fuddie duddies say.

But to jokingly talk about “drinking bong water” instead of Kool Aid makes it clear that you’ve never actually cleaned a bong. That shit is nasty! And if you put cyanide in it, it will result in a relatively safe substance, no one will be tempted to taste it.


#8

…off a cliff! Wheee! So long money-people! Keep it real!


#9

One would think that a substantial proportion of the opposition to legalization of marijuana would be from those who stand to benefit financially from the illegal trafficking and not merely from elderly curmudgeons. Is there just that much more money to be made from its legalization?


#10

Big Tobacco has historically been against legalization, they don’t want any competition that they can’t also dominate.

The benefits from legalization aren’t likely to make any single entity rich, they mostly have to do with society not having to spend so much money on this nonsense. As the drug wars wind down, we might hope for some kind of peace dividend.


#11

FWIW, there’s a sense in Mexico that changes like these are allowed to happen only if it has already been decided that this is going to happen and that cases like these serve to introduce the legal framework under which the new laws will operate. Mexico already implemented small scale decriminalization very quietly a few years ago, so quietly that its hard to tell what the law really is at this point, but as first steps go, it was a decisive one.

But there’s also another angle, now that the US can legally produce weed, I’ve been wondering when a black market will be created for high grade, non GMO, organic weed smuggled in from the US.
Maybe it already exists, I don’t know, but wouldn’t that be an interesting development?


#12

Repeal C-51 and TPP, you pretty fuck.


#13

The older generation is not anti pot, we brought the weed to the attention and use of the dominant population that is now the most active voting generation. We were the first American generation to embrace the weed. Prior to that it was mostly a feature of the non-white population. Though there were many exceptions in some more hip segments.


#14

Its funny you should say that, bu if you think about it, as its legalized in more places in the US, then the demand for smuggling it in will likely drop. Sure there’s a demand for it here, but not on the scale of the demand for it in the US.

The sad truth is that the violence has always been about fighting over who gets to smuggle it across the border, if all drugs were legalized, you’d still have people fighting over smuggling routes.


#15

Yeah, you’re supposed to save it for the coffin shooters. “Just a dab will drop ya”.


#16

Resistance is also from the alcohol and pharmaceutical industries.


#17

Efforts toward Legalization in Canada will benefit enormously from the improved climate in the US. per wikipedia - Failed decriminalization bills (2003, 2004)

The bill looked likely to pass into law, but it died when Parliament prorogued. The bill's death was largely due to pressure from the American government's Drug Enforcement Administration, which had threatened to slow down border-crossings along the Canadian-American border with increased searches for cannabis.

#18

Canada, Mexico, and then finally USA. In that order, and likely soon.


#19

Even if you’re a total bad ass Mexican drug lord, fighting others has a cost. So if we make it less profitable to smuggle stuff over the border, there’s less incentive to fight, and finding another way to make money (legal or otherwise) becomes more attractive.


#20

I’ve never understood this argument. Weed and tobacco are two different markets, both are big, and the overlap does not in any way cannibalize the other.

I suspect they are just a little gun shy from the legal battles from the last decades and want other organizations to fight the prohibition fight. But when prohibition is ended, expect to see Marlboro Green, and a surge in their stock price.