Clear reflective spray for cyclists who ride at night


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/10/17/clear-reflective-spray-for-cyc.html


#2

This stuff?


#3

Looks to be the same, under the manufacturers brand instead of Volvo.

Happy with it thus far. Haven’t found out its making my septic tank or field glow yet.


#4

I constantly worry some distracted motorist will run me down and say “I never even saw him.”

My personal record on a motorcycle is 3 times, each instance the driver made that very statement.


#5

motorcyclist approved.

will flood the instagram/flickr long exposure photo/video pools


#6

I still prefer to not ride at night.

I hear ya, but Daylight Saving Time is just about over and work doesn’t let out at 4.


#7

Environmental impact statement please. Looks to me like one more completely unnecessary source of micro-plastics in our water supply.


#8

To hear the riders tell it, this isn’t completely unnecessary. Far from it.

Ultimate value vs. environmental harm is open for debate.


#9

This sounds like an aerosol version of the reflective coating used to mark highways. As I understand it, the reflective component is the top layer composed of extremely fine glass beads, almost dust-like in consistency. (DIYers: yes, you can buy just the beads and in many different sizes. Can’t recall where but I’ve found them online before.)

RydeSafe decals work on the same principle. I have them on my bikes and like them a lot.


#10

More bike lanes are necessary.
Better road design is necessary.
Driver re-training is necessary.
Reflective gear for cyclists is (sadly) necessary.

But wash-off paint containing micro-plastics is not, by any stretch of the imagination, necessary.
It is completely stupid.


#11

As a driver I’ve noticed that the bigger issue is not seeing bikes because of the headlight glare from oncoming cars. If you have some lights and some reflective strips its probably enough, but if you are in that weird zone where you disappear into oncoming lights all the reflective stuff in the world won’t help.


#12

One thing:

Hi-viz jackets usually have retroreflective patches/piping, like Scotchlite or the special crystal grit in road sign paint. It reflects light directly back to its source.

I’d like to see a comparison with this paint and retroreflective material, and at a distance.


#13

bookmarking this for next year’s burning man evening wear.


#14

Also good for Halloween. Can enhance a variety of costumes.


#15

The stuff wears off after about a week.

…but you have to wear the same clothes for a week.


#16

Also useful for re-enacting scenes from the original TRON. In the dark, that is.


#17

Another way to be safe is to not ride a pushbike in traffic.


#18

Interesting stuff, but it wearing off in a week makes it a no-go for me.

I prefer the Lightweights stickers. They come in a variety of shapes to put everywhere. I used some to put on all the spokes of my bike, others on the gloves I wear in cold weather (stickers have easily survived hand-washing) and to add more reflection to my high-vis (but not reflective) bike vest, on the paniers of my cargorack… I also used their Stealth Tape all over my bike’s frame. I look like a regular Tron character when you shine light on me.

Of course, all that’s on top of regular bike lights. I’m partial to Cygolite’s, currently using Dash 350 with combo red rear light. Thinking of upgrading.

Didn’t stop that guy from blowing through their stop sign and almost running me over the other week, but I like to think that it has at least reduced the likelihood of that happening. It was only the 3rd scare I got in 2 years of bike commuting, but then I’m lucky with an 8-mile commute that’s nearly all residential and/or has bike lanes.


#19

http://downloads.cdn.re-in.de/1400000-1499999/001414766-si-01-en-ALBEDO100_REFLEKTOR_SPRAY_TEXTIL_100ML.pdf

tl;dr - don’t ever drink it. Use it as an aerosol only. It’s about as bad as an equal amount of sharpie marker with one exception - a weird bit of chemistry - one of the components photodegrades into formaldehyde. Not much, but there you have it.

This is really cool stuff. Plenty of good uses.


#20

Found Jay Maynard. :wink: