Code Pink activist laughed at Jeff Sessions, now faces a year in prison


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/05/03/emperors-clothes.html


#2

He has a dry sense of humor.


#3

This is bizarro land stuff.
Really?

No, REALLY?


#4

I’ve been laughing at that ostracized Keebler elf for decades now. Canada here I come.


#5

This is going to have the same effect as sonic weapons for mass protests: raise the stakes for protest, the protest doesn’t suddenly go away, it gets more serious. I dont think Jeff Sessions’ job is going to get any easier after this. If the rest of us are doing our jobs, it’s only going to get harder.


#6

Jeff Sessions is a joke, aren’t we supposed to laugh at him?


#7

This is “Holy hell!” territory. She faces actual jail time—for expressing disagreement, incredulity, contempt, whatever. She laughed and mocked him and might go to jail for it. How is this possible?


#8

The Republican party has no shame.


#9

So retroactively convict this man?


#10

No. That’s not the direction we need to be going at all. On either side.


#11

Oh, I fully agree. Just pointing out a fine bit of hypocrisy.


#12

If only the American right were as passionate purists about the First Amendment as they are about the Second.


#13

Oh yeah. Absolutely, they are full fledged hypocrites.


#14

Don a KKK robe ironically and you get a year in prison. Don one sincerely and you get a cabinet position.


#15

In Soviet Amerika, government laugh at you!


#16

The one thing certain to get up fascists noses is to laugh at them. Nothing else is as guaranteed to successfully rile them. Please laugh at your local fascist. In public. To their faces. They may spontaneously explode. At the very least you should get some good incoherent spluttering on video.

(Sorry to hear about Ms. Fairooz being caught by some bullshit propriety rules that have bad consequences because she is deemed to “impede, disrupt, and disturb orderly conduct” of a hearing. And next time any of the bigwigs crack a joke between them in such a context, I hope a prosecutor will be on hand to press charges for such disorderly conduct.)


#17

The vast bulk of the American media and a large proportion of the American electorate still seem to be operating under the delusion that this is a normal situation that will be resolved via opinion polls and electoral marketing.

It isn’t. America is now an increasingly authoritarian one-party state. The GOP has been signalling for years that they are completely willing to rig elections and override majority opinion; they have no reason to alter this trajectory now that it has succeeded. Disenfranchisement (backed up by the fascist-friendly USSC) and the electoral college give them a permanent lock on power for as long as they’re willing to take it.

There is no rational basis to the assumption that the GOP will inexplicably commit suicide by halting their disenfranchisement campaign. The slavers are back in power, and they aren’t going to relinquish it any easier than they did last time.


#18

i dunno, this was in the middle of a Senate hearing - that’s a heavy duty decorum kind of situation - she was there to protest, wearing a pink liberty headdress or something and carrying a sign, ok, that’s allowed, good - but sheesh, it’s like court, keep a lid on it or Rusty the Bailiff will escort you out, no surprise there

ok, sure the prison sentence might be excessive - too bad the video doesn’t show “the laugh” and we could judge for ourselves whether it seems like a willful disruption - did anyone see a non-partisan-seeming description or do we only have her word for it?


#19

Saw this quote from another article:

Well, if the police don’t think it’s funny, then I guess that’s settled.


#20

The Senate chamber public gallery is the wrong location in which to engage in consequence-free civil disobedience.

From https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/art/common/slideshow/Gallerypass/GalleryPass_Intro.htm

A code of conduct for visitors to the galleries is set by the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration and is enforced by the doorkeepers. In 1959 the Senate began printing these rules … on the back of each pass. … Some activities are also forbidden, such as smoking, reading, taking notes, and applause.

It doesn’t strictly rule out laughing, but that would seem to be in the spirit of the code of conduct.