Continuing coronavirus happenings (Part 2)

The whole point of the vaccine court is that you don’t have to prove anything. They have a list of “recognised adverse events,” and if you have one they pay out. It’s not ideal, but it was the only way to keep a viable vaccine program in this country. The profit margin is tiny on the legacy vaccines, and if not for this law, they would have been sued out of business long ago.

15 Likes

The court does pay out for adverse reactions. The most famous one recently involved a child with ASD and some sort of mitochondrial condition that was worsened due to a vaccine, which invited the question as to whether the court had found that the vaccine had made the “autism worse”.

6 Likes

From NYT morning briefing:

Schools have reopened safely
Even before teachers are fully vaccinated — a process which can take more than a month after the first shot — many schools have shown how to reopen.
It involves “masking, social distancing, hand-washing, adequate ventilation and contact tracing,” as Susan Dominus wrote

Emphasis mine because, this is not news to anyone is it? This is how we could’ve kept almost everything operational since the beginning. :woman_facepalming:t2:

17 Likes

the hardest part in most areas is the “adequate ventilation” standard. my high school in texas did an upgrade to the hvac system over last summer. it cost $300,000+ to accomplish, increases the school’s utility costs by $1,200/month, and required a major cut to other budgets. my school district is fairly wealthy compared to many other districts. that was for one building housing 2,200 students and staff.

22 Likes

Yeah, I’m guessing that’s why the ventilation portion of the CDC guidelines are very softly worded, “consider” doing this, whereas all the other (sometimes less effective) practices are written in the imperative.
It’s going to be expensive in any retrofit situation.

18 Likes

This is particularly true in older, more poorly maintained schools which, of course, also tend to serve areas with lesser financial resources. Of course, they also serve a population that tends more BIPoC, and so will likely be conveniently ignored. Same as it ever was.

21 Likes

Reuters reprint

19 Likes

Because packing in more kids than they should is always an option to some folks:

17 Likes

So much for “The Science”. Sigh.

12 Likes

The company reiterated that it will have capacity to provide 100 million vaccine doses to the U.S. by the end of June. That supply will help government officials reach the goal of having enough injections to vaccinate most adult Americans later this year. On a global scale, the company aims to produce 1 billion doses this year.

Guessing this is the one I’ll wind up getting.

12 Likes

As long as one wears a “proper” mask under this (or two), I love seeing people making something playful like this:


If I saw her while out running my errands, would def be a bright spot.

22 Likes
8 Likes
8 Likes
9 Likes

the purpose of a corporation is to relieve individuals of liability

there is never any reason to relieve the corporation of liability

being liable for things is the reason it exists

12 Likes
10 Likes

Thank God

I wonder when i’ll be able to get it in my arm

22 Likes

They’re behind on manufacture, unfortunately, though they think they can catch up by June.

5 Likes

Well there is the significant difference between what Boris actually says and the way he says it.

He says this stuff with all the tiggerish optimism one would expect but if you look at the actual words they’re all nicely caveated.

Even the sentence you quoted - the relevant bit is “intended”. All the things you listed have been given as examples of things that could prevent that intention coming into fruition in response to subsequent questions.

But if you’re a Daily Mail reader, you can just listen to Boris’ tone and feel all glowy and warm that we have a PM who isn’t a doomster or a gloomster.

The EU hasn’t given them blanket immunity either.

10 Likes
14 Likes