Court nails man who shot neighbor's drone


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Unfortunately, even with a positive court judgement, the poor drone navigator is left living next to LUNATIC!

This unstable shooter is a goddamn crazy person who deserves to have his guns taken away for untrained and reckless use.

HE FITS NO DEFINITION OF A RESPONSIBLE GUN OWNER, NOT EVEN BY BATSHIT-CRAZY NRA STANDARDS!

I’d like his guns to be removed, personally, by a smiling Barack Obama. That would be rich.


#3

That’s the sort of quality logic that could carry a solopsist far. The collisions with reality must be painful, though.

The grim thing is that this guy is seeking a school board position.


#4

Firing a gun in a residential area is illegal just about everywhere, I think. Doesn’t matter how red your neck is, didn’t you learn gun safety growing up?


#5

“Good day, sir!” (Turns away, and carries on with personal business)


#6

There is a justifiable suspicion of and contempt for surveillance culture. I understand the neighbor’s discomfort with a drone with a potential close range aerial view of him home flying right next door.

However, “Whatcha doin’ with that drone?” would have been better than “Bang!”

A shotgun approach to the situation clearly was not warranted. The gun culture seems to view gunfire as the best solution to any problem.

Mister Neighbor Man, please ask what’s up before you shoot at stuff. Mister Judge Man, please ask Mister Neighbor Man to see a doctor to make sure he’s right in the head and fit to own firearms and charge him a hefty fine. Mister Drone Pilot Man, maybe think about engaging Mister Neighbor Man with a “Don’t be alarmed by my drone. You are not under surveillance.” conversation before takeoff.


#7

#8

I’m surprised there wasn’t a phone-call to the police by the drone pilot right on the spot.


#10

Shooter offers 350 (edited, I had my facts incorrect and said 750) to an intermittently polite neighbor for admittedly damaging his property, gets taken to court by that neighbor and has to pay 850 instead. I think this is actually funny. Were there criminal charges to be filed, good chance they would have been. Maybe he could just tell the dude when he is checking out his orchards next time, like I’d want my neighbor to do if he were going to be operating some novel, distracting, and potentially privacy invading equipment above fence level.

I wouldn’t assume that it was obvious that this was operated by his neighbor.

Edit: If the neighbor had stopped by to be polite before rather than after, maybe things would have gone differently, and everyone in range would have had the same good information?

What is unsafe about firing buck shot in a rural walnut grove?


#18

If you’re accidentally hitting peoples’ houses, you’re too close, and it sounds like he did on more than one occasion.


#19

I live in a very rural area, and lots of people have guns. I doubt that the gentleman with the shotgun considered the basic rule:
Always be sure of your target and what is beyond it.

The fact that the drone operator’s residence has been fired upon 3 times leaves me with no sympathy for his rural neighbor.


#20

You don’t need a drone to peek over the neighbor’s fence, all you need is a freaking ladder (like the kind you’d probably use to trim the trees in your orchard). The drone operator had every right to expect that he should be able to fly HIS OWN DRONE over HIS OWN PROPERTY without getting permission from his psycho neighbor first.

This isn’t WWI trench warfare. Poking up above fence level shouldn’t be an immediate invitation for gunfire.


#21

He doesn’t need to get permission. What a funny position to take.

But he can hardly be surprised that he surprised his neighbor. Both of em. They deserve each other.


#22

That’s heading toward some serious “false equivalency” territory.

I’d say unloading a shotgun into your neighbor’s property without warning is many orders of magnitude more discourteous and surprising than flying a remote-controlled toy over your own property. And the guy with the shotgun has apparently damaged the drone operator’s private property several times. What the hell did the drone operator do to “deserve” living next to someone like that?


#23

Drones. The effectively divisive ideological device within this community.


#24

Presumably it varies from one place to the next, but as an example, it was illegal to discharge a firearm in Austin, TX but not in the unincorporated parts of Travis County. When my friend moved to the area, at first he was sharing a house outside the city limits. The next-door neighbor (however close or far that may have been) would come over to the property boundary and just fire his shotgun into the air, because he could. I don’t know if the guy was a 4-door asshole in the first place, or there was some real or perceived offense that made him do this, but he would fire the gun when he knew they were home. When they called the county sheriff to complain, they said they really couldn’t do anything since he wasn’t shooting at them or onto their property. Aside from the difference in firearm restrictions, I guess the county didn’t have nuisance laws that the city would have had. (Eventually my friend moved into town.)

EDIT for typos etc.


#25

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