Court tells Trump that he can't demand details and data on everyone who talked about protesting his inauguration


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/10/11/disruptj20-org.html


#2

I really wish the headline read:
“Court slaps Trump upside the head with thick and heavy brief detailing why he can’t demand details and data on everyone who talked about protesting his inauguration.”

You know, just in case he might learn something through osmosis.


#3


#4

“Trump’s DoJ argued that since there was some violence at the inauguration protests, they needed everyone’s details to prosecute the guilty.”

Trump wants to know who in particular to pardon if prosecuted.


#5


#7

Not a total victory. They still get to rummage through people’s emails, and they get to keep their justification for doing so a secret so that it can’t be challenged. What possible justification could there be for that secrecy?

Hopefully that will get cleared away on the next round. In the meantime, “of the people, by the people, for the people” has worn pretty thin.


#8

This is not a win for the people. Not at all.


#9

Is the glass 9/10 empty or 1/10 full?


#10

It’s not a win for him, either.


#11

Oh joy. The ever rightward drift isn’t quite as speedy. But we’ll get there eventually.


#12

I’ll take every stalemate and delay of armageddon that I can get, thanks.


#13

This case shouldn’t even exist in the first place. Trump’s DOJ is bringing felony charges against hundreds of protesters and threatening to jail them for up to 70 years, all because they ruined his big day. And since malicious prosecution isn’t enough, now he wants to dox everyone who even thought about protesting his inauguration.

I’m honestly shocked the prosecution of these protesters isn’t a major ongoing national news story - how much more of a blatant and dangerous abuse of power could there be? More info here: http://defendj20resistance.org/


#14

I confess. I have thought nasty things about Trump. I have thought he was pretty unfit for the job of reality TV show host, let alone being President. I have thought his election was an insult to all the people who ever fought for democracy and the rule of law. I have thought that he brings not only the US but the countries who suck up to him into disrepute. If I could think of a way that was economical, legal and effective of removing him and Pence from the scene, I would strongly recommend its adoption.

The FBI is welcome to investigate my website at 127.0.0.1 for further details including contact information.


#15

For fuck’s sake, why don’t people use PGP?


#16

Because PGP is complicated? It also wouldn’t help with the meta-data (so the addresses of all people that mailed and the subjects of their emails would still be known).


#17

It can’t possibly be any less effective than everything else that has been tried.


#18

Id like for someone to somehow do a follow up after the next election cycle and see how many of these names have missing registrations the day of voting.


#19

Lots. But I’m gonna go with “they hurt my feelings, I hate them!”

Valid justifications on the other hand…


#20

Is it not? I keep seeing Trump open with the most wildly insane things only to see the right immediately approve which is odd considering his well known, favorite, and completely lame negotiating tactic is to offer up a moon-shot position from which he can negotiate back to what he really wants. His over the top request was denied but I see it as likely that he got what he wanted out of the deal.


#21

PGP was OK back in the day before retention of server logs, State interference in ISPs and the like. Now we know that the NSA is using exploits to monitor computers, in which case PGP is useless (on The Register I used the analogy that while Alice and Bob may be using strong encryption to conceal what they are up to in the bathroom, it’s not much use if Carol is hiding in the bathroom cabinet, and a number of people are agreeing with me).
Kaspersky is being banned for federal workers in the US presumably because the Israelis have discovered that Kaspersky is collecting data about NSA exploits in the wild, and presumably adding countermeasures to their AV. So unless Kaspersky is banned, the NSA cannot monitor US citizens so easily. That shows how important Trojans have now become to the TLAs.
Meta-data just adds to the surveillance.

The bottom line is that we are in what John Le Carré calls “Moscow rules” in his books - it is not really possible to use electronic means of communication for anything you don’t want the State to know about. (In his book The Russia House, the CIA wires up the British agent and break the Moscow Rules, resulting in his exposure).