Crazy "Slip N Slide"-esque contraption made from clothesline and electric motor


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/01/30/crazy-slip-n-slide-esque-c.html


#2

As a mom I cringe watching something like this.


#3

Of course, in the Northern Hemisphere, the Slip and Slide will go in a clockwise motion… always.


#4

:sunglasses:


#5

That looks like good clean fun


#6

It’s goon sack roulette, but with people!


#7

Clothesline or a Hills Hoist?

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-04/hills-hoist-australian-backyard-icon-ownership-change/8161430


#8

Sliding on the “carpet” area looks fun.

Sliding off, not so much.


#9

Why didn’t we think of doing that when I was a kid? All we did was use some big pieces of vinyl to extend the length of our regular old Slip-n-Slide. Man, going in crazy motorized circles would’ve been WAY more fun.


#10

Wait, you featured this, but failed to include the video of this Australian hero with a flag cape going a bunch of rotations, before sliding off smooth as you like, grabbing a beer while doing a backward tumble and taking a big swig, without ever spilling a drop? Poor form, Pes, poor form.


#11

I understand usage of the Slip N Slide was associated with severe neck injuries, which might explain why it doesn’t seem like I hear much about it anymore. (Or it might just be because I am outside of the target market.) In that regard this contraption seems both safer and more amusing.


#12

Pesco, you’re on fire today!


#13

Neither?


#14

Somehow, just by reading the headline, I knew this was gonna have happened in my country.

Straya!


#15

We had a rotary clothesline rig like that in our USA backyard from roughly 1961 to 1980-something. It probably didn’t come from Australia… more likely either a US knock-off, or my father built it. I had no idea it was an iconic Ozzie thing.


#16

Looks to still be a going concern. Plenty of knock-offs too. Not sure how you think that this backyard torture device is safer though.


#17

I was wondering about the inherent risk in the activities in these (this and the linked) video’s and how it seems there is a different attitude towards risk (involved in leisure activities) in different countries.

Is there such a difference? Am I correct in assuming Australia would be higher on this list then (for example)
the USA (accepting more risk)? What countries would be at the top, which at the bottom?

Discuss.


#18

Nah, hold my beer…


#19


#20

It appears that you can start from a seated position in this case, and that it is the initial impact that has the greatest potential to cause damage in the stationary version.