Disney's obsession with doe-eyed, button nosed female animated characters


#1

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#2

I imagine this make mass-producing dolls much easier.


#3

I grew up with Disney ‘magic’
The wonderful animation,
and extraordinary nature shows.

Today’s Dizny merchandise machine
and mind-f#ck television trash must
have Walt spinning in his cryo-chamber.

Their CGI mesmerizing, over-stimulated,
kiddy shows are a shameless shill for consumption.


#4

I think there is a genuine issue at the core of this article — there is clearly far more physical diversity among animated male protagonists than among animated female protagonists — but there’s also some heavy selection bias used to make the article work.

There are other female characters in modern Disney/Pixar movies who don’t have the standard “Disney Face” — Colette in Ratatouille and Edna Mode in the Incredibles come immediately to mind.

Like I said, there definitely is an issue with Disney and physical diversity among its female characters… it’s just not as cut and dry as this article makes it seem.


#5

It is if you restrict it to protagonists. Which is more significant than diversity in secondary characters.


#6

Not all the male characters she uses are protagonists though.


#7

#FTFY 


#8

Did anyone else notice that the horse in Frozen was clearly just a copy of the horse Maximus in Tangled?

A lot of this clearly comes from recycling character models to save time and money. There is clearly a scene in Tangled on the boat with the lanterns, where they recycled a facial expression that they used with Violet in the Incredibles as well.


#9

If you take a look at the Boing-Boing post about “The Princess Who Saved Herself”, you’ll see the same thing! Even when someone tries to liberate the feminine, the same stupid-cute face seems indulged.


#10

Next article should be titled: BoingBoing’s obsession with Disney.


#11

I… am not really seeing an issue here? In her example I see many variations on a theme. While I guess there is some elements that remain similar, there are a lot of elements that are different, while retaining a similar style.

Personally I think they are much more varied than say your typical Anime, whose characters often look the same not just across the same studio, but over the whole genre. And they take big, doe-eyes with button noses to new levels.

ETA - while in her example alone I see more variations of say thinner faces vs rounder ones, I think the limitations in facial structures is because round things are what humans tend to view as “cute”, as systematical things we tend to view as “pretty”. Many of those male characters aren’t going for “cute”, some of them are more “oafish” and a few down right villainous.


#12

I’m not talking about her. I’m saying if you do it independently, that’s what you’ll find.


#13

Also, by the way, my daughter tells me this character in Big Hero6 is Hispanic


#14

What exactly is a hispanic person supposed to look like?


#15

The reason is obvious - men don’t have to be pretty to be important.


#16

Pretty sure they all wear Sombreros.


#17

It probably says more about the pervasive influence of Japanese animation on Disney/PIxar and american animation in general than a particular Disney obsession.

Look at the pre-80’s style Disney animation, female characters are much different.


#18

It’s not that there aren’t Latina ladies who look like this, but her background was barely perceptible in any way - her looks, her accent, her mannerisms. Maybe if they had made it more part of her character, so what if she is light skinned, but I saw the movie and it was completely news to me that she was.Hispanic.


#19

Apparently the voice actress is Hispanic.

There are Hispanics with blonde hair and green eyes? Hell yeah.

It has less to do with ethnicity than with USA’s census racial bias.


#20

the male ones are action figures :wink: