How female animated characters look with more natural features


#1

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#2

Because cartoons have always been about accurately capturing natural forms.


#3

Some of the edited versions are distinctly Uncanny Valley.


#4

Is it weird that I find every single one of them better after the ‘naturalisation’? I thought it would be the opposite.


#5

I think the edits all look much better than the origianl. And I had no real problem with how they were before but with the edits I feel like it would be possible to approach some of these characters differently. They certainly leave a different impression.


#6

This is very interesting, and I would like to see what it would look like if the idea was taken even further. It feels as though the edits are still very ‘cartoony’. Unfortunately I’m not an artist.

I suspect this would move down the uncanny valley, but at some point climb out again. Very, very curious.

Taken to the other extreme, how far can we move into caricature before it falls apart? Is there a clear boundary, or is this all dependent on culture and exposure?


#7

Now we just have to push for animals to be more realistically portrayed. Of course, that may not end well for some of these animated humans…


#8

To be fair, these are only slightly more natural. Their eyes are now the size of lemur’s eyes, rather than Aye-Aye’s eyes.


#9

I had the same reaction. The edited versions look less like caricatures and more like real people. I guess the caricaturization is a style, but I’d love it if the style shifted in the direction suggested by these edits.


#10

You totally ruined it for me… [note sarcasm]


#11

I find it striking how viewing the pre- and post-naturalized photos really draws attention to how bizarre and almost-creepy the originals are. I think maybe it robs them of a requisite amount suspension of disbelief? It’s interesting because the artist has stated that was definitely not their intent, but it’s certainly the effect.


#12

I wonder why she didn’t do this with male characters as well. Are they less distorted? It’s possible, I’m no animaton phrenologist.

It would also be interesting to do this with anime characters, who pioneered huge eye/tiny mouth neoteny before it was cool.


#13

They still have the heads and faces of toddlers, but it’s definitely an improvement.


#14

I don’t see the difference…?


#15

Here’s an article that addressed the comparison between male and female faces pretty thoroughly, at least for disney/pixar:


#16

I’ve thought for a while now there is a trend in these films towards making them look more rodent/ squirrel like. the eyes are migrating outward towards the side of the head and the nose downward. It’s weird. yeah.


#17

The Rapunzel edit makes her look a bit like Mandy Moore now, which wasn’t really the case with the original design.


#18


#19

Better as still images, sure. To a certain extent (definitely not just this, but) part of the reason for the unnatural features is the same reason actors in stage plays where makeup to make their eyes look larger and stuff though - it’s much easier to convey emotions and expressions quickly when the eyes are larger than they are in real life and draw more attention, especially in the middle of lots of other things happening.


#20

I honestly thought many/most of them looked significantly more mainstream image of beauty idealized. Am I the only one?