Dog dislikes being flipped off


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/07/27/dog-dislikes-being-flipped-off.html


#2

excarnated

Thanks, glad to learn that new word today!

The video though strikes me as kinda nasty. Never did like to watch people tease and piss off their pets.


#3

That dude had better be careful in bed.


#4

Hear, hear! If I had a house guest who continually messed with my dog he’d end up with both a dog bite and a broken nose.


#5

Not sure if excarnated is the proper term here, since that generally applies to removal of flesh from corpses.

Perhaps “degloved”? (NB: do not search “degloving” if you have a weak stomach)


#6

They would serve as excellent training videos if not for the fact that some pet owners are unteachable.


#7

I was thinking “avulsed” (similar disclosure).


#8

Don’t get me started on how terrible the cat+cucumber thing from last year was.


#9

Yeah, and the dog definitely learned that getting flicked off is a bad thing from somewhere; I’m guessing that house isn’t the most pleasant in the world.


#10

Nice ligatures.


#11

Agree. Once gave a kid a “going over” for scowling at a recent rescue who was still afraid of everything- just to solicit a fear reaction from her.

That said, after watching the vid, the dog appears to be fully locked in play mode with that finger… IMHO at least.


#12

I once opened my mum’s fridge to find a kitten had snuck in there and was quite happily gnawing on a cucumber in the freezing dark. #notallcats


#13

Yeah, that’s not “play”. That’s aggression. I’d bet that there has either been some serious negative reinforcement associated with “getting the finger” in that household with that particular dog (read “abuse”), or that is one dog with some serious inherent aggression issues that needs some serious training/behavior modification/medication etc…

Qualifications: Actual Veterinarian with significant behavior training.

This kind of thing isn’t cute or funny. Despite being small, this dog is dangerous. Even small dog bites can cause serious injury or infection, particularly with the elderly or with small children. It’s all fun and games until someone gets a serious infection, or loses sensation in a finger because a freakily accurate bite compromises a nerve etc…


#14

I’m sorry, but, respectfully, I have to disagree.

@ 0:04 dog is clearly in play - on the other side of the coffee table, waging his tail
@ 0:08 “attack” stops right at the initial engagement - angry dog/abused dog? I don’t see it.
@ 0:12 dog goes from relaxed to engaged and back again, but only “attacks” the finger and drops back out of play again - this finger is clearly being presented as a "play item”.

I had a chihuahua mut (chihuahua plus mystery component X) for sixteen years and she behaved similarly – had a very snarly play mode (snarling like this dog she would place her mouth in my hand and I would open/close her mouth and it would sound like a demon saying “ma ma” – I regret not capturing that on video…:cry:)…

Another member of that pack (Aussie Shephard + Rottweiler mix) has two “triggers” which turn him to play mode - which is distinguished by & much more so in his youth - ferocious growling and barking: (1) placing a hand on top of his head & pressing down (a game he used to play with anyone – with Alpha approval) and (2) presenting at him with “karate” hands (this is only for me) - as both are indicators to engage in “play” as in my house we are a pack, and pack play can appear aggressive to an outsider.

I will also sometimes wear gloves and a padded forearm for “highly aggressive play” where he has more leeway with his bite – and he knows that, and gets excited when I take the gloves out. He also knows the “you’re biting me too hard" command and will immediately release into submission. Yet, at the same time, he will also get quite surely and call BS! :rage: when I use that command if he knows he hasn’t been biting too hard.

He’s now a grandpa and a member of a new pack (the current one), while he will engage a stranger on command he has also passed his service animal test. When I first got sick I up-trained him so he could help me out – yet he still loves that karate hands are an invitation to play rough. Yet only my “karate hands” solicit this response from him.

FYI: For quite some time now (both of the above included) I’ve only adopted dogs which would have otherwise been put down for “socialization issues” ie: they cannot go to “normal” homes because of issues they had with their initial development and/or temperament. I rescue lost causes – and I’m happy to say they thrive.

To be clear, I don’t disagree that even small dogs can be dangerous - but to say it isn’t “cute or funny” isn’t quite accurate either. Per your “qualifications” you should well know that dogs are as much individuals as we are, so neither of us actually knows what’s going on - it’s all best guess.


#15


#16

:joy_cat:

That’s assault!


#17

You don’t mess with calicos.


#18

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