Dyson Humidifier


#1

[Permalink]


#2

Also, most likely, too expensive…


#3

Oh look, another Dyson product that claims to be a magical new kind of fan but just has a perfectly normal fan hidden inside its base…and costs more than existing devices that move more air for less money with similar noise levels. Oh and yes, humidifiers that don’t breed microbes and maintain humidity levels have been around for a while too.


#4

But there are already quiet, cheap, and hygienic humidifiers that look good. This just has a Dyson fan stapled on.

I’d care more if it didn’t have a stupid LED lit up whenever it was on.


#5

Fall 2015 : /
Vaporware…


#6

So, does anybody have a recommendation for a room-sized humidifier that’s actually easy to clean? UV lights are nice and all, but I’d feel much better if I could just clean the damn thing thoroughly.

My current humidifiers have closed fan chambers that collect dust and hidden water chambers that build up mineral residue and there’s no way to get into either. I try to vacuum as much of the dust as possible, and I run vinegar and bleach solutions (not at the same time) through the “wet” parts, but I’d feel much better if I could get into all those parts with a paper towel and actually wipe them out.


#7

Not a fan.

:wink:


#8

I got the one sweethome recommended: http://thesweethome.com/reviews/the-best-humidifier/

Everything is pretty easy to clean. The top reservoir comes off to reveal a shallow basin that has all the water ducts and ultrasonic plate, so you can easily wipe it down and bleach it. The reservoir might be a little tricky, but the opening it wide enough for a hand and I never had a problem with it getting dirty.


#9

While it does have a fan the housing is designed to move more air with less turbulence which having seen them in person does actually work. Is it worth it when you can be 3 or 4 fans for the price, likely not.


#10

Totally waiting for the Shark version to come out.


#11

Looks like some sort of portable Interocitor.


#12

Here’s my pitch:
Drop the room temperature. The RH will go up, for free!


#13

Awesome! another insanely expensive product from Dyson where they invent something novel and then attempt to promote it in market by inventing problems that don’t really exist in the competing designs. (or not so novel in this case as it just looks like their fan in a bucket of water)

Hand dryers excepted.


#14

I’ve been pretty happy with this. My understanding is that hot-mist humidifiers are generally more sanitary than cool-mist to begin with, because the heat dissuades a lot of bugs; this one has no moving parts, just a heating element that creates steam. The heating chamber is easily accessible for wiping down; the storage tank opening is a bit too small to put your hand through, but I think you could get in there with a bottle brush or similar. The instructions recommend cleaning the tank with bleach solution and the heating chamber with vinegar.


#15

I’m guessing you live somewhere that doesn’t get below freezing in the winter.


#16

Literally :wink:


#18

I haven’t personally tried any of these products but these guys are usually pretty spot on with their picks


#19

I live on the East Coast of Canada. It gets cold here, though not as cold as in Montréal or 'Winter’peg.

But the basic information is correct, trust me. Relative Humidity is ‘relative’ to the maximum amount of humidity that the air can hold at that temperature (look up ‘dew point’). So a RH of 50% means that the air is holding about 50% of the water vapour (<-- see! Canajan, eh.) it could hold at that temperature. Take that same block of air, increase the temperature but keep the same amount of water vapour and the RH drops.

Unless it’s very cold, say below -20degC, the winter air outside has a comfortable bit of humidity, typically 50%. Bring that cold, humid air into your house, heat it some thirty-five degrees ©, and you get a RH of 10%, bleeding noses, cracked skin, etc.

I drop my indoor temp to 17degC in the daytime winter, 15degC at night (cold bedroom, warm bed). It only takes me a week or two to acclimate. And I don’t need to run a humidifier to get the 30-40% RH I’m usually to maintain. (Yes, I’ve measured it.)

In the summer, people pay good money to be comfortable in shorts and t-shirts at that temperature. Why couldn’t you be comfortable in the winter at the exact same temperature when you’ve got a sweater on?

In any case, I sleep better, my nasal passage remain clear. And I can spend all that money I save on a good single-malt.


#20

What, you mean the “choppy air” from a typical fan didn’t bother the living hell out of you for all those years?


#21

Glad that someone got my mist.