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#1

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#2

This is the Internet of Things I keep hearing will be a nightmare when it gets hacked?


#4

Giving google a real-time hi-res video feed of the inside of my home is a bit 1984, even if you’re not paranoid…


#5

saves you loads of money on your energy bill

dunno about that - upshot of the reviews i read seemed to be it can save a little maybe, but it isn’t cheap at $250 - i bought a $35 wireless remote thermostat instead, will set the couple of cycles i need in my house, already saved $215 - how long would it take to amortize the Nest at the modest rate it saves gas? - not versus no thermostat but versus the cheap programmable one

similar to my quick calc on an electric car which suggested 300 year payback time versus my old paid-for gashog - YMMV


#6

I can’t use the Nest without doing a bunch of rewiring - I’ve got electric heat, and a 220V thermostat, and when the last one died, there weren’t even any simple timer-based electronic thermostats rated for enough power, just dumb thermocouple dial types. (I suppose there may be some kind of relay I could fit in, but then I’d have to get low-voltage power to the thermostat.)

I certainly don’t want the Big Brother camera system…


#7

Last time I bought a car, the calculations for lifetime gasoline cost for a car looked like $5/gallon * (200K mile lifetime of car / mpg ), which is about $1M / mpg. So that’d be $20K for a 50mpg Prius, or $50K for a 20mpg SUV. (I ended up buying a 30mpg car, so it’ll cost about $33K in gas over its lifetime, and it was about $8K cheaper than the Prius. If I’d bought the Prius the year before, there’d have been a $7K tax credit, oops, plus I’d have saved most of the cost of gas for my old beater van.)


#8

I like Nest. There seems to be no reason why we would have dumb thermostats running our heating and cooling that costs us thousands per year .

That said, I am still a little frustrated they done have remote sensors so you can run multiple zones off one device.

I also wish they had an automation hub so lights and locks could be integrated too. Wink has that, but reviews are pretty mixed. despite the promise of home automation for decades it seems as illusive as the flying car until recently when it seems a few companies seem to be starting to get serious.


#9

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