Family calls cops for help with harassment, cop shoots their dog and complains about the cost of the bullet


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/11/09/evangeline-parish-louisiana.html


#2

Come on, it was a rat terrier. Even their owners hate them.


#3

You can buy a box of 25 nickel cased .45 Auto (the more expensive of the two kinds of handgun rounds cops use. The other being 9mm), for $21-$26 at a popular sporting goods store.

If you’re a police department, you can get 10,000 rounds for actual practice and training nearly at cost.

This guy is full of shit. In both cases. Objectively. But here’s the numbers for part 2.

Anyway, hollowpoints are cheaper from a materials standpoint anyway. They have less material. Since they’re hollow in the front. Unless you use something stupid, like nickel cases. Supposedly more corrosion resistant than brass. You know, that yellow metal they make stuff on seafaring ships out of. Also, oilite, a brass alloy originally sold on the fact that it’s very low friction, especially brass-on-brass. So that jamming and sticking is less likely.

All in all, it sounds like somebody wanted to pretend a situation he deals with probably every day is somehow exceptionally dangerous. Then tried to blame the family on his own laziness and disregard.

“It was an expensive hollowpoint”

Feh, it’s not like he’s paying for it. And it’s not coming out of his pension either. And the more practice rounds he uses, the more he gets anyway. That’s how funding for training works.


#4

It must be great to have a pet that acts like a psychopathic extension of your ego, and yet be able to ignore its impact on your interaction with fellow humans.


#6

I didn’t know they let you keep cops as pets


#7

Ya know, I used to like The Andy Griffith Show (I still like Andy – ‘What is was, was football’ is still histerically funny). At the time Barney was amusing, if annoying. Now…his mind-set, his bullet and much, much more are the norm and Andy is dead.


#8

I’d be willing to bet mail carriers and courier delivery people are more at risk of being bitten than cops, and no one has yet seen fit to arm them and give them carte blanche to go around executing people’s pets for their own safety.

Obviously, there’s some natural reticence when it comes to arming postal workers, but still …


#9


#10

How do people restrain themselves from attacking the cop when this happens? All the reasons why you shouldn’t are obvious, but when someone callously and uncaringly shoots your pet for no reason, in front of your kids…

I mean, I don’t get aggressively angry in real life; most things don’t rile me up, and I’m extremely placid, forgiving, and good-humoured in general. But cruelty to animals or children… that makes me feel absolutely murderous, and I think I’m just lucky not to have direct experience of it so far.


#11

Fear. Once the gun is out, their privilege is gone.


#12

People who should never, ever call the cops in America:

Brown folks, poor folks, women, people with mentally ill family members, people with pets…

You know, at this point I’m thinking nobody in America should ever call the cops except for other cops and seemingly sane white men with money.


#13

I suspect that the fact that he just put a hollowpoint into the family dog for what appears to be no more than amusement; and has little risk of serious consideration consequences if he does the same to you(and he has the rest of the magazine ready should the spirit move him), has something to do with it.

He totally deserves it; but (even if the shock of the event didn’t have you rattled beyond concerted action) you aren’t in a good position to deliver.


#14

Why would a police officer use hollow-point bullets?


#15

Time for PDs to start screening for psychopathy–unless they already do, in which case it’s time for them to start using positive results of those screenings as an exclusionary measure.


#16

I don’t know anything about the cost of hollowpoint bullets, but I’m pretty sure the real expense comes from having so many hollowsoul cops.


#17

I believe it is because that way they dont have to worry as much about what is behind their target.
Which can be good, but also let them dispense bullets even more liberally.


#18

Actually I see this as a sign of breakdown of authority. The less people see the police as a group that can help them and preserve the peace, and start to see them as a threat, the more they will resort to “self help” to deal with disputes with their neighbors. Over time, in areas where the state is weak, we may even see the rise of non state actors who provide their own brand of dispute resolution and peace keeping.


#19

I think I can see a few errors there.

You’re equating existence of ridiculously egregious examples of authoritarian death cultism run amok = meaningful numbers of people outside our echo chamber get the picture = birth of actual collective agency … pretty hopeful stuff.

And then you reckon the authoritarian authorities are gonna just stand aside and be usurped? It’s a bedtime story.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xPhLDYVyK5Y


#20

Agreed.

There is hardly any situation that won’t be made objectively worse by the addition of an armed, hyper-privileged, authoritarian whose control needs (once he arrives) become the sole priority.


#21

Solution: invite him over for dinner. Then after he’s enjoyed his pork chops you tell him it was rat terrier.