Family: police high-fived after tasering our handcuffed relative to death


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Police are trained to not kill people, you know. They just encourage one another to ignore that training, as seen in this millionth example. I’m willing to bet it’s there in the manual, somewhere: “If the suspect is handcuffed, they are not resisting arrest, even if they squirm around and shout bad words.”


#3

That training is hugely inconsistent and woefully incomplete at best. At worst, given the lack of standards for US police training, it can be entirely absent - in fact, training related to mental health issues is pretty uniformly absent or insufficient. (This isn’t even counting the training that’s given that’s demonstrably wrong - that’s something that happens all too often, too.) And when you have ten times more training for guns than de-escalation techniques, which is more likely to be used? Although given that there’s almost never any consequences for ignoring that training, they do that too, of course…


#4

Ugh… this is horrible. My heart goes out to the family.

FYI, this is way out west of ATL, not too far from the Alabama border. Coweta is pretty rural. I wouldn’t be surprised if the cops there are relatively insular and corrupt.


#5

implying they are not corrupted as well in urban areas…


#6

You’re right… I’d say many police forces are corruption… just probably in different ways.


#7

I just had an idea that would address several problems at once.

Many people have suggested some kind of compulsory government service, like they have in Switzerland or, God forbid, Isreal. With such a vast pool of candidates for police service, a higher turnover wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing. It’s always been dangerous to rely to heavily on a small group of specialists to guard the general welfare.

So let’s make career policeman less of a thing. Sure, you want experienced commanders, and for the right people, it could be like the college students who never leave, just become professors. That’s ok.

But most cops would serve a 4 or 8 year term, maybe, and then get mustered out to join the general civilian population.

And if that system were in place, you wouldn’t be looking at administrative leave for accidentally killing someone, it would simply be mandatory separation, no prejudice necessary. Keeping someone who’s killed on the force sends a message that this is the kind of thing that needs to be done, and it’s part of the skill set that these cops will teach each other and rely on in the future.

As fucked up as it is, they had reason to high five each other. Rather than judge these individuals and hope it goes away, let’s just remove that reason.


#8

Relative to what, exactly?


#9

Not sure about Israel but in Switzerland it’s either military service or a civil alternative service (like driving an ambulance or supporting the nurses in a hospital).

Police service is not an option, and I think this is a good idea - policing requires training, most important are communication/deescalation techniques and rights and duties, firearm usage is secondary (in a civil society like Switzerland police officers rarely draw a weapon). Basic training of a police officer is nearly as long as the military service term; using draftees as cops would lower the quality of the policing.

Maybe it could work in the US, though. I think many trainings for new LEOs are measured in weeks and not - like here in Europe - in months or years.


#10

Does anyone care to make a wager on the color of Mr. Sherman’s skin? I think we all know already.


#11

Coweta County is mostly white folk, but my question is, what is the “drug spice”?


#12

Without reading the article, you wouldn’t know already. There’s a picture of Chase in happier times at the beach. He looks pretty Caucasian to me.


#13

It’s a drug that prolongs life, provides limited insight into the future, and allows the Navigator’s Guild to safely fold space.

Oh, wait. Wrong context.

I think you’re asking about this:


#14

Oh is that what we’re calling bullshit fake weed these days? This spice must not flow!


#15

Corrupt, you can certainly do; but ‘insular’ is tricky once you get to the scale of an urban PD.


#16

you should feel like a complete idiot right now. people jump to conclusions on both sides, thereby informing me that it is neither brown people or pasty people that need to get fucked, but the entire human race. i hate, but i hate in totality.


#17

Yet another consequence of prohibition.

The assorted synthetic cannabinoids going around are largely untested, frequently dangerous, difficult to detect (problematic for mine safety etc.; drug testing of heavy equipment operators is a legitimate concern) and just generally worse in all respects when compared to the real thing.

Nobody would be smoking this shit if the real stuff was legal.


#18

You may need to spend more time thinking about instituting a 4-8 year draft service that draftees can forcibly terminate early by killing a civilian. It might not result in the reformed compassionate police force you expect it to.


#19

There is way too much of this going on. And even for those of us who would not normally even need to interact with the police, there is always the fear that an officer could come to your house for some random, unexpected reason and casually shoot your dog, then claim that they are " following training that required him to shoot all dogs that approach him", even if the dog is friendly.

If only there was some sort of national political movement to challenge the militarization and casual violence of the police in these cases.


#20

Can someone explain the process of handcuffing someone while kneeling on their chest?