FBI Director: viral videos make cops afraid to do their jobs

#21

Took the words outta my mouth.

If your average burger flipper has to be monitored, or your average call center flunky, or any of a dozen or hundred other jobs has to be monitored?

You will be monitored too. Think of it as less ‘we are watching you’ and more as ‘you now have video proof when a suspect is being suspicoious.’

Or are there too many cops out there that use siezure loopholes, and ‘stop resisting arrest’ to power trip for you to like that?

11 Likes
#22

Heck, why not just call it the “Rodney King” effect? That videographer was exposing police brutality through widely viewed recordings before it was cool.

19 Likes
#23

Well now I have to rethink “We should retrain the police, they’ve already been here this long it would be far more reasonable to have them just do their job better,” to “We need to fire everyone and start over.”

2 Likes
#24

George Holliday.

(edit: added link)

3 Likes
#25

Isn’t this what the cops say about us?

3 Likes
#26

Police should not be afraid of making mistakes. We all make honest mistakes. No one expects them to be perfect.

But ‘perfect’ isn’t the issue.

They’ve been caught killing, shooting, and beating innocent people and not-so-innocent people just because they can… and lying about it.

They need to stop that. No sympathy at all when their misdeeds are caught.

The police need to police themselves or suffer the consequences of public wrath, which may not be fair or proportional, but neither is what they’ve been doing.

20 Likes
#27

2 Likes
#28

Should viral video be added to the list?

10 Likes
#29

3 Likes
#30

“Cameras” covers it, but I added “Video” to that entry.

2 Likes
#31

Chicago PD has seen a work slowdown following the protests over the police shooting of Laquan McDonald, which resulted in a murder indictment hours after journalists released footage of the years-old shooting. The slowdown is real – it shows up clearly in various open-data-ish police metrics. The reason behind it, of course, is up for debate. Crime has risen during this period, though causation is not established.

These aren’t particularly high risk encounters – traffic stops, detective work and so on – so the “we’re surveilled” argument rings pretty hollow to me. I think there’s some fragile egos involved.

6 Likes
#32

Fragile egos, and swollen heads don’t belong in the police force. Fire them, and start over again. The job is to protect us. Not their egos. And we should be willing to be patient enough to fill that role, rather than just taking what we can get.

8 Likes
#33

There are so many comments here I agree with, I’m running out of ‘likes’.

8 Likes
#34

Remarkably, the “Ferguson Effect” has been touted as explaining the ‘explosion’ of black and Latino crimes against cops…Yet 70% of the increase in attacks against cops are us whiteys! IMO, having worked with the public, you tend to reap what you sow. If you can’t treat the people you are paid to protect with courtesy, you will face a backlash. That time has arrived. Cameras just provide evidence of the ugly side of our police forces. If you can’t perform your job under uncomfortable circumstances, maybe it’s time to find different employment.

9 Likes
#35

When being cited, do you prefer ‘HungryJoe’ or another handle? Because I’m going to be quoting/paraphrasing that for quite some time.

3 Likes
#36

65 years of Hollywood police propaganda vs a couple years of “viral” videos showing things the way they actually are? Boo hoo.

If we ever have police dramas that depict the level of actual corruption revealed in these last few years, there would be a revolution. I guess that’s why there hasn’t been any such shows.

10 Likes
#37

Police misdeeds have been protected for decades and the police probably took that as endorsement for their illegal actions. Thanks to cell phones having video, those misdeeds are now often brought to light.
So now you have police getting in trouble for something they have always done and they don’t like that.

5 Likes
#38

Speaking of, is it just me in my paranoia, or a lot of crime proceedurals depicting a lot of 'we know this person is guilty as sin but we’re getting hamstrung because of little things like proceedure, bleeding heart rights activists, and grandstanding assholes with money?

13 Likes
#39

So, according to Director Comey, police need less surveillance but the public needs more?

5 Likes
#40

I’m glad they are avoiding confrontation and thinking twice. These statements by the FBI boggle my mind.

3 Likes