General Mills recalls some flours after 38 people got sick with E. coli


#1

[Read the post]


#2

I guess that I picked the wrong time to quit freebasing…


#3

I usually only use it for thickening sauces and gravies, and I don’t think that’s enough heat to kill le Coli. And that’s my usual brand, so I suppose I’m doomed.


#4

If you heat the fat first, then add the flour, then cook it just a little bit, that should be enough to sterilize, I’d think. Standard roux procedure. Then you add it to your liquid for thickening.


#5

Pathogens and Bacteria, my stock and trade! I can’t wait for the chit chat around the H2o cooler tomorrow. Oh glorious life of mine…


#6

I’m eating flour right now.


#7

You rebel! I’ll happily pump your stomach for free!

Uwe! That sounds kind’a nasty.


#8

I bet you say that to all the avatars.


#9

I demure.

Always wanted to “demure”, and this is my chance.


#10

Well I’ll see your demure and raise you two demurrers … and an E. coli.


#11

I have always wanted to demure…

You’re living your best life sir


#12

I don’t demure, but I demur demurely.


#13

E. Coli is a gut bacteria. It lives in shit.

So my first question is, how did shit get in the fricking flour? It’s not like meat, where there is already shit inside the original animal and it’s completely plausible for it to get inside the meat if you use sweatshop labour and don’t bother to follow basic safety procedures. You kind of have to work hard to get shit in the flour though. Sadly, food safety for industrial food in the US is pretty much a joke so there will probably never be an investigation.


#14

Wrong thread, we’re not talking politics.


#15

O dear. 2 bags of flour matching those descriptions, both about 90% consumed.


#16

Deer droppings near the wheat?

Seriously, look it up, it was the genuine cause of at least one produce-related outbreak. We don’t grow these things in sterile labs. They’re out in the open for anything to come by and poop on. A lot of times we can irradiate produce, but people don’t like that because of unfounded fears that it will do some scientifically unsound bullshit and irradiation does cost a little money. Other times, we pay more to have our stuff grown in shit instead of synthetic fertilizers. We call that “organic.” (I’m not knocking food that’s grown in properly composted manure, but my point stands).

The only solution for this sort of thing is batching and batch labeling. Oh, and for us as a civilization to stop abusing antibiotics.


#17

The most likely route is through fertilization of the crop. There is also currently no sterilization process used in the preparation of flour, unlike products like dairy and eggs, which are pasteurized.

One article on the topic: Fate of Escherichia coli during Ensiling of Wheat and Corn


#18

Serious question: why are so many American companies called General? General Motors, General Electric, etc.?

I’ve always wondered and can’t find the right way to ask google so it brings me the info I want.


#19

Answer by Dana H. Schulz on quora.com
"I believe that “General” was intended to convey a broad range of related lines of business, and a broad range of products within each line.

This implication of size, stability, and reliability could be helpful for a publicly-held corporation that wished to make itself attractive to retail investors.

Thus, for example, GM was considered, until the Great Recession, a “widow and orphan” stock, one that is sufficiently reliable for a risk-averse, vulnerable stockholder"
https://www.quora.com/For-what-reason-do-so-many-companies-choose-to-use-the-word-General-in-their-name


#20

Thanks :slight_smile: