Here’s what it’s like to live in an eco-friendly “Earthship”


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/02/19/heres-what-its-like-to-l.html


#2

#3

Very awesome to see the inside of an Earthship – and hey, Michael Reynolds! Pity this is such a BuzzFeed video, complete with “omg I have to fart” and “ewww dirt” from the hosts.


#4

I’ve always been fascinated by Earthships, would love to visit one. Or better… live in one :slight_smile:


#5

I had the fortune to meet Michael Reynolds and tour a few of those Earthships. Amazing. They seem best suited to a desert environment, and if I lived in that type of climate, I would definitely want to live in one.

I found the hosts of this video annoying and couldn’t watch much of it.


#6

“You can’t argue with bananas in your living room in the winter.”

But you can just look at them.


#7

are Earthships all that eco-friendly? I was a huge fan of the concept and the aesthetic. But I don’t have the good fortune to be living in Arizona or New Mexico, and as I kept reading, critiques like the one below kept cropping up…
Let’s just say I have some questions about the applicability of the design outside of a narrow climate band.


#8

I’ve been ruint by this. I recently saw a posting in a bicycling forum “Hey, anyone remember banana seats?” with a photo of several 1960’s Stingray bikes. I posted the mandatory response, which absolutely no one liked.


#9

That’s like saying swamp coolers don’t work because they won’t work in humid areas.

I’ve exclusively only heard of Earthships as a suitable home for arid areas and why they work there. Its no surprise to hear they’re not a good fit elsewhere, but i would say that they are indeed eco-friendly. If someone tries to shoehorn their use elsewhere that’s their prerogative and ignorance.


#10

Michael Reynolds, the earthship expert (inventor?) featured, stated in the video that he was heading to Puerto Rico because of their post-hurricane need for off-the-grid, wind proof building. Considering the climate differences between New Mexico’s high desert and Puerto Rico’s tropics, I’m curious to see how the concept is adapted.


#11

Being ignorant of the topic under discussion is not exactly a strong base from which to pass judgement.

Not that tire-based construction is all that great, either. Oh sure, you’ve kept all those tires out of the landfill. There’s just the slight problem of outgassing as the tires break down in direct proximity to human habitation.


#12

I never claimed to be an expert but ok mate.


#13

I was wondering that too, and found this:


(That video would be more reassuring if he didn’t rub his hands in front of the fire so much.)


#14

Interesting, but bottles, tires and cans? We recycle those these days.

If I had a pile of cash, I’d go for a Futuro 2 deck mothership, with modern materials rather than fiberglass, and a lot more environmental monitoring.


#15

It requires a wood stove to stay warm – so if you want to travel, say, for the holidays you’ve got to drain all your water pipes etc.


#16

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