High-ranking chess player caught cheating with wearable tech


#1

[Read the post]


#2

High-ranking?

Not anymore…


#3

What is the motivation?
According to: http://www.chessdom.com/56th-international-chess-festival-of-imperia/

“Top prizes in Group A are € 700 / € 500 / € 400 / € 300.”

Seems like the tech would cost more than the prize money. I don’t know anything about the chess world. Are there lucrative Wheaties box endorsements to be made in the chess world?


#4

I’d imagine part of it is just the desire to be regarded as a high-ranking chess player.


#5

Is machine-played chess noticeably different from the human variety? It’s my understanding that computers have become quite punchy at the game; but unless their style is very similar it seems like even a successful cheater would live under the cloud of just not playing quite right, even if people can’t prove it they’ll still talk; which you’d think would really spoil the enjoyment of victory.


#6

Chess computers play significantly better than the best human competitors. In the 20 years since Deep Blue vs. Kasparov, computers have long-surpassed us, and it’s simply not a contest any more.

Therefore, there is certainly such a thing as playing “too perfectly.” If a human consistently makes the best moves, according to the top chess engines, then it’s extremely unlikely that the human is playing unaided.

That said, it would be hard to prove, unless you had the same chess engine yourself and could see that the human was also picking that specific engine’s top move. (Which may not even always give the same move in the same scenario.)

In this case, the judge was probably made suspicious simply by the player playing much better than expected — you don’t expect a non-famous player to be consistently beating all their opponents.


#7

Dude was just trying to act presidential, y’know?

http://fair.org/extra-online-articles/the-emperors-new-hump/


#8

I once worked with a fellow who had chosen not to go into professional chess playing because he thought the people were just too weird. He was, himself, the oddball genius type, but still related well enough that he recognized being a part of that world full time would not be healthy. Instead he got serious about the hobby of running because he preferred the people he met, and he played chess with a person at work by taking a four move handicap.

Anecdotal, sure.


#9

Cheating aside, did he use unauthorized copyright chess pieces?


#10
  1. e3
  2. Qh5
  3. Qxf7
  4. Qxe8

?


#11

Yeah I’m not sure exactly how they worked the handicap.


#12

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