How to make insects appetizing to Americans


#1

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#2

Can you make bread from the flour you mill?


#3

UGH! No thanks. This American is only willing to eat the insect (parts) that are in the other foods he eats. I just do not want to know about them. Bugs are icky.


#4

I would prolly eat a single celled protein combined with synthetic aminos,  vitamins, and minerals (everything the body needs) before snacking on crickets et al.


#5

Man, I remember many years ago (like, 10+) when I first read about the 'new world order'/UN/conspiracy-bogieman-of-the-week and how "part of the plan" was to get 1st world countries switched over to bug-meat instead of meat-meat. I dunno about the rest of you, but I laughed and laughed at the time about 'those silly conspiracy-nuts'. Then, for the past 6 months, I keep reading articles like these from various news sources (and now my beloved Boing Boing).

IMO, "no. Just... no" about covers it. I'll raise my own chickens before I deliberately eat bugs (and I say this as a life-long city-dweller). Maybe some of these tin-foil guys aren't as far-fetched as we thought?


#6

I also need some more info on the flouring process and what you can do with the flour.

Do you just mush up live crickets or do you have to cook/dry them first?


#7

"My grandfather was in the Air Force for 23 years and fought in three wars. He slid down tarps on the sides of mountains in Greenland," climbed on the wings of planes mid-air to conduct repairs, "and always managed to come home not only alive and well, but with gifts for my grandmother."

To hell with the bugs, I want to hear more about this wing-walking master mechanic of a grandfather. Apparently, John Henry the Steel Drivin' Man had nothing on him.


#8

"these facts aren’t enough to convince the average American"

Let me know when you'll try to convince the rich American (you know, the 1%) to eat insects.
Or in the future the working class will eat cockroaches while the riches will continue to eat filet mignon?


#9

To be fair, lobsters "back in the day" were considered peasant-food. "Bugs of the sea", etc, and were routinely provided as cheap eats to the poor and working-class. They've only been considered a rich-man's delicacy in the last hundred years or so (and yes, I'm looking for a citation right now, thanks for asking smile )


#10

Honestly my first thought was I'd try them if they were tempura battered and fried like they do the heads when you order sweet shrimp at a sushi place. Or maybe tacos. Hot sauce fixes everything.


#11

My only problem with eating insects has been that I don't want crunchy exoskeleton in my mouth. It would be like eating a big mouthful of popcorn hulls. Grinding it up into flour seems like a good solution to that problem.


#12

Allegedly there were laws on the books in New England back in the day that you could only feed prisoners so much lobster per week, on the idea that excessive servings constituted inhuman treatment.

I'd be willing to try something made with crickets, but am curious what other sorts of things you can make with it. I'm guessing it's largely protein, which seems like it'd not cook/taste quite like traditional baked goods, but probably wouldn't come out like ground meat if rehydrated either.


#13

This stuff may be good for the planet. It may be good tasting, or, failing that, good enough tasting that it's ethically groovy.

But it's made out of bugs. Bugs.

Whenever I see stuff like this, no matter how apparently well-intentioned it may be, I think of Robt. Anton Wilson's The Universe Next Door. Specifically, the parts involving the People's Ecology Party and its founder, Furbish Lousewart V (author of the monumental best-seller, Unsafe Wherever You Go.)

Revolution of Lowered Expectations indeed.


#14

I once had a couple dried, cajun seasoned mealworms. Can't remember the seasonings standing out, but the texture was pretty much like eating mein gon (a.k.a. crunchy chow mein) noodles. Could have gotten used to that.


#15

Brand them as the eco-friendly sustainable alternative to crab/shrimp/lobster.


#16

I'm very surprised by all this bug hate. I, for one, look forward to the day I can eat a bug burger.


#17

Perhaps they could get around the "Eww, bugs..." problem by getting an endorsement from a famous spin-bowler.

This would then only leave them with the "Ewww, Warnie..." problem.


#18

Oh give me a home
Where the buggalo roam


#19

Depends how far you're willing to stretch the definition of "bread"...


#20

I am fairly squeamish about many unusual foods but I think this could be an easy way for me to get used to eating insects. There are just so many different unknowns in starting out with whole bugs: will I find the taste unpleasant, will the crunchy and/or squishy texture turn me off, will seeing those stalk-eyes staring at me while I eat it be unsettling? Starting out by just seeing if I find the taste appealing then adding some of the other factors might work well.