How to remove all tourists from your travel shots


#1

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#2

In other words, if you see someone pointing a camera on a tripod towards a monument with a crowd of tourists (that you are a member of), try to stand perfectly still.


#3

My phone has a setting to do that… Tried it once, but don’t recall the results.


#4

I thought it was going to be physically. Like “pass gas and then once it clears out take your photo.” This is more effective and reliable.


#5

This is useful. I use Photoshop every day and didn’t know this. I just tried it by shooting 6 shots of my interior with me posing in a different spot for each photo and ran it through the Photoshop process and it looks good, but there’s ghosts of myself, so you definitely need more than 6 shots, probably like 15.


#6

But what if we only want the tourists?


#7

Sounds like you don’t want the median, you want the mode. Does Photoshop do that? If it did, it would remove moving people with very few pictures.


#8

It’s an interesting idea, but am I the only one that thinks touristy locations without people are kind of creepy? Like city streets with no people, it just feels dystopian.


#9

The only thing worse than a city without people is a city with people.


#10

People without a city?

Imagine thousands of businessmen and women with suitcases, talking to their phones in the middle of a vast prairie, no signs of civilization anywhere.


#11

You can use a similar trick to eliminate scaffolding poles / lampposts from in front of a subject - take a number of pictures from say 15ft away, moving sideways between each one so different parts of the subject are obscured each time, then process the images together.


#12

Long ago I went to a Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit with some friends. The night before we were drinking a bit of beer, though one friend had quite a bit more beer, ate a jar of garlic stuffed olives, and ate few hotdogs with a lot of sauerkraut. The exhibit was really busy except for wherever he went, though it was unbearable to follow him around.


#13

Indeed. And that’s why I live outside an itty-bitty town no one has heard of. I can go days without seeing anyone who doesn’t actually live in my house. :smiley:


#14

Is that a photo of Lindos in Rhodes? Looks familiar.


#15

Strictly speaking, the mode wouldn’t be well-defined in a signal any noise to speak of (in that no two images would have exactly the same value for a given pixel) which is what I’d expect.


#16

Yes, but you can easily code for that. If you have four pictures and three have a carved stone colored pixel with slight variability and one has a red shirt colored pixel, it’s pretty easy to tell which one to throw away when making the output picture.

Maybe I should just try making a program that does it this way and see how well it works.


#17

Tried my phone’s removal function – wasn’t a good test since my wife was moving the car forward as I was collecting the pics…
It did remove pedestrians from the crosswalk, but it also caused a" transporter error" where one fellow was merged with a jeep and another jeep didn’t get stitched back together well over in the sidewalk area.

Edit: I wonder if the problems with the Jeeps arose because they were also rolling forward?


#18

I can get OCD about extracting humans from photos of things, but realized I had to let it go. Sometimes it’s interesting to have the crowds milling around the frame.


#19

In the future the procedure will be to speak the words “remove people”, and hope for the best.


#20

I’m afraid I can’t do that, Dave.