In Chicago, it's impossible to get dirty cops investigated


#1

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#2

These guys need to contact the Chicago Sun-Times. They love talking down dirty cops.


#3

For all the pictures of a cop hugging a black child, for all the stories of a cop digging into their own wallet to help someone in need, for all the genuine good that the police can do, you won’t see the cops cooperate in bringing one of their own to justice. Which makes the entire force no better than their most corrupt member.


#4

It looks like they already have. The Sun Times reported that the city paid the men a $185,000 settlement, but the police have never admitted any wrongdoing.

That last part is the reason this story is still relevant.


#5

Hey, I have been repeatedly assured that only black people need to fear getting beaten up by police, so I have to assume this photo has been 'shopped

It’s not like there’s actually any sort of systemic problem with corrupt justice systems and police brutality, you know, it’s just strictly racism that’s a problem with law enforcement today.


#6

I’m sorry, but my snark detector is out of order this afternoon.

Are you being ironic, are you serious, or maybe just trolling?


#7

Bad apples, the lot of em.


#8

Most likely my own snark generator has gone off the rails.

I’ve recently overdosed on people loudly insisting that every incident of abuse of power is actually an incident of racism. Even the UUA wants to disregard the abused people in Ferguson, MO who aren’t black (that would be about 30% of them, I’m told) in order to endorse a racism narrative. Who cares if there is a problem with police brutality and court corruption? We just need to make sure there’s no racism in the mix, then everything is sure to be OK, right?

I guess you can expect offensively politically incorrect posts from me until I get it out of my system… sorry.


#9

Explain to me where the difference between police violence/arbitrariness/repression in some third-world-shithole (or Russia, China) and the USA is. Apart from self-congratulatory freedom-agitprop …


#10

Not sure with this case, but not having to admit wrongdoing is usually part of the settlement.


#11

Good point. I wonder if something more specific was offered. In the Chicago Sun-Times article First Deputy Corporation Counsel Leslie Darling admits that several mistakes were made, both by the police and paramedics, but Darling’s statement simply lists these as factors in the decision to settle. The final quoted statement pretty well sums it up:

The plaintiffs are highly-educated and present well. Their accounts of what took place would be supported by the parking lot surveillance video. In addition, the photos of their bloody faces and clothes will make an impact on the jury, even though neither suffered serious or permanent injury.


#12

Go ahead and find one person who’s alleged that systemic problems with corrupt justice systems and police brutality don’t exist, but only systemic racism.

We’ll be here.


#13

Well, if police brutality starts to affect rich white people equally, then the cops would have something like a fight on their hands…


#14


#15

That’s the reason Ferguson is still relevant, it wasn’t about Michael Brown per say. His death was merely the last straw in that community, for what many of the community see as a lack of accountability when it comes to the police.

Even if you feel Wilson was justified in his use of force, he failed to follow proper procedures to preserve evidence in the wake of a shooting. Allowing him to turn his own gun in for example.

Use of force by the police is something that should be under strict review every time it happens in this country, but there is no accountability. We don’t even know how many people the police shoot each year, because only 4 percent of police departments volunteer that information to the FBI.

Then Union’s and Arbitrators can keep bad cops on the streets easily. http://m.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/12/how-police-unions-keep-abusive-cops-on-the-street/383258/?single_page=true#ad-jump-ad-mobile-instream-1

All of which leads to a mistrust in the police, which hurts the community and hurts the efforts of the police to keep the streets safe. Since nobody is going to talk to the police, if they don’t trust the police.

That mistrust is not misplaced at the moment.


#16

Sure, here’s one! Have fun beating him up and stuff.


#17

Translation:

Christ, what assholes!


#18

Police brutality has never stopped affecting poor white people and that’s a lot of folks.


#19

According to TFA, they each wound up with $45K, which the city then spitefully tried to have declared taxable. (The judge wasn’t having it though.)

I think I’d advocate violent resistance here. If the PD is going to act like an occupying army anyway, they should be treated like one.


#20

[quote="Medievalist]Hey, I have been repeatedly assured that only black people need to fear getting beaten up by police, so I have to assume this photo has been 'shopped

It’s not like there’s actually any sort of systemic problem with corrupt justice systems and police brutality, you know, it’s just strictly racism that’s a problem with law enforcement today.[/quote]

You have been repeatedly assured of this - by strawmen? At least one of us has a confuse.