Interview with the first artist in the US to be convicted of artistic obscenity


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/07/26/25-years-later.html


#2

To be fair, the not returning to Florida thing was probably a blessing in disguise.


#3

“Oh no, Br’er Fox! Not the briar patch! Anywhere but the briar patch!”


#4

Having moved to Gainesville right at the beginning of the murders, it was not a good time for anyone who looked, acted, or thought “differently”. Hysteria was at an all-time high.

The overall impression I got was two competing factions - rural-traditional-conservative, “god-fearing”, law-abiding citizens aligned with police and local politicians who were convinced pot was going to cause world war 3 in Florida - and the other side of university academics, art and poly-sci students, and generally well-informed youth, who were basically tired of all the bullshit.


#5

gasp limits to freedom of speech in the USA? Color me surprised.


#6

Does anyone actually believe this is the country with the most freedoms?


#7

It is still one of. There are many with a similar amount (though when it was founded, it was more unique.

To be certain this whole thing is BS, but obscenity laws and pornography have been two touchy subjects in our history. Still, while you can point to cases of people getting in trouble, there is a lot more where no one has.

Heck, just compare it to Japan where they have to pixilate their porn.


#8

So ‘yadda, yadda, yadda no’.


#9

Find a country with no obscenity laws. WE can all move there. Or at least know who makes the best porn.


#10

Tomi Ungerer tried to provoke that with his book Fornicon in 1969, but it didn’t work.


#11

If you can afford them, yes.


#12

So paydoms not freedoms.


#13

He was hilarious when he was trying to vomit on a Bible.


#14

Has it ever been the country with most freedoms?


#15

true, the slogan (land of the free) never matched the laws


#16

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