Jail starves mentally ill man to death, Sheriff is "sorry"


#21

Does it? It seems to me seeking and accepting help is the difference itself.


#22

I have a very close friend who has a mental health diagnosis, to be vague about it. Every time they go to the doctor, no matter what it’s for, they are treated poorly. For example, “It’s all in your head” was one doctor’s diagnosis of what turned out to be shingles when diagnosed and treated by a different doctor. They sought help, received it, and are still (some 15 years later) being stigmatized by medical professionals. I know this isn’t the same thing as being left to die in a cell, but stigma exists.


#23

The way I interpreted the headline: “Jail starves [extra vulnerable] man to death, Sheriff is ‘sorry’”

The mentally ill part, to me, doesn’t stigmatize mental health, but rather illustrates the fact that these officers failed to not kill someone who was at higher risk than the average population. But clearly it’s up to interpretation, so my own perception of the headline’s meaning is just that, my own.

Come to think of it, that could be stigmatizing as well… I get your point, and agree that the mentally ill part isn’t necessary for the headline.


#24

I think in this case the intention was to evoke empathy for the inmate: “he wasn’t a criminal who deserved abuse, he was a sick man who deserved care”.

Which is a little problematic to me, because I don’t think we should be abusing criminals whether it feels like they deserve it or not, because retribution doesn’t actually get the effect we want. But I don’t think it’s about dehumanizing/othering the prisoner, rather exactly the opposite.


#25

Hey I wouldn’t want to go on vacation if I was a cop, it would totally cut into my killing time. I’d be like Chief, you can’t do this to me, I was going to go beat on some black kids and strangle a nice elderly lady. But the chief would make me go because he is tough but fair, and then he would go out and look sad and say he was sorry about the people I killed. Darn it, that would be awful. Almost enough to make me not want to be a cop and never kill anybody.


#26

All I can say, is if the police manage to kill me while I’m in custody, I don’t want the page six story to say that I “struggled” with mental health issues. I’d rather people know I celebrated them.


#27

“The two corrections deputies who were being investigated for falsifying logs have resigned. They admitted to changing the logs after Farris was found dead to look as if they performed required checks.”


#28

Because his metal health issues were not properly addressed at ALL the various jails he was shuffled around to, and because of this he is now dead. Their ignoring his mental health issues is a critical part of this story…not that he had such issues, but that everyone ignored what his needs were.


#29

It’s worth reading this article about it:

http://www.heraldnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?aid=/20150618/NEWS01/150619222/Island-County-sheriff-apologizes-for-jail-dehydration-death&template=MobileArt


#30

Quote on Keaton’s memorial program…

“I see your hate, and raise you One Love.” - Keaton Farris


#31

This ‘sheriff’ is a guy who should be out of his fucking job! Yesterday!


#32

But no person was at fault, it was the system that killed this man.

Damn that system! Always forcing people to act like inhuman monsters…


#33

That will live longer than the sheriff and his murdering cronies or any memory of the sheriff and his murdering cronies, excepting that when their names are gone people will still be able to reference that this person Keaton Farris was murdered by those nameless thugs.


#34

he struggled with mental health issues.

How so?

The cops are crazy!


#35

That must be such a comfort to the victim’s family!


#36

Bullshit. If they had ignored his mental health issues, that would mean he goes without his meds for a few days. They didn’t merely ignore his need for mental health support, they ignored his need for WATER. Do you think it’s feels any different to die of thirst when you have a mental health issue?


#37

Oh, absolutely! No matter what the actual complaint, your word is suspect and it’s considered psychosomatic, because they’d really rather not have to deal with a crazy person, there are specialists for that.


#38

If you know you’re going to be lumped in with murderers if you admit to needing help, how’s that going to impact your decision to ask for it (or not)


#39

You’ve taken my comment out of context.

Your context is substandard care. The context I was referring to was an assumption of mental illness = murdery, specifically and only made by purported readers of any article which implies that, as described in the post I was responding to.

not ANY stigmas might exist, and which are also suffered through, but that ONE specifically from the conversational context, about this case somewhat specifically.

Both suck, but you’ve changed the subject and I believe possibly misinterpreted me. Probably not in that order though, and not likely intentionally.

mental illness sucks. We all gotta take care.


#40

Weird how mentally ill people KNOW things as absolutes that the rest of us find up for open debate.

Much of mental illness is KNOWing things that are not ACTUAL