Jewelry from destroyed guns and bullets


#1

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#2

Just don't wear it to North Carolina...
Save the Gun law: North Carolina bill takes effect


#3

Very cool, and looks well crafted. And from their mission statement:

I dig it.


#4

That only applies to guns from buyback programs. It's not applicable to confiscated illegal firearms.

Edit: The article actually uses both "buyback" and "confiscate," so I'm not sure anymore.


#5

I went looking for jewelry made out of gun parts, but based on the designs I saw, it looks like they're just melting down the metal and using that instead.

All things being equal, I think I'd prefer the vision I went in looking for.


#6

Because the only thing that stops a bad guy with an ugly ring, bracelet or necklace is a good guy with a handsome ring, bracelet or necklace.


#7

As is usually the case, the comments make the baby jebus cry.

Edit to add: that scheme is fux0ringly moronic. They may as well not bother with the buy-backs and confiscations, since the weapons are going straight back where they came from. At best this seems like (yet another) way to funnel taxpayer money into lobbyist's pockets:
Step 1) licensed gun dealers sell firearms at a profit
Step 2) Police confiscate firearms from owners, or buy them using monies raised via tax
Step 3a) Police "donate" any firearms they buy/confiscate back to licensed gun dealers
Step 3b) Police sell any firearms they buy/confiscate back to licensed gun dealers
Step 4) GOTO Step1)

The underpants gnomes couldn't have come up with a better scheme! Any bets on who the strongest supporters of this absurd piece of legislation were?


#8

This is a little crude but it is a bolt face of an AR-15.

I think this jewelery idea is interesting, but the jewelry itself is rather crap IMHO. While looking for something else I did find this - which I thought looked more like a work of art. Same idea - but more refined.

source: http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2011/11/18/jewelry-made-from-ak-47s-for-greater-good/


#9

i would love to buy this necklace in particular: http://libertyunited.com/products/silver-gunmetal-aeternum-necklace but dear lord i do not have $600 to spare for ANYTHING, let alone jewelry. i do like that part of the proceeds go to charity.


#10

I suspect illegally owned firearms and illegal firearms and being confused. A firearm owned by a felon is illegally owned buy may be perfectly legal for an unconvicted person to own.


#11

Step 2 is unlikely to happen. Someone who is not permitted to own a firearm by law cannot buy one from a licensed dealer thus the firearm will only be confiscated if the owner subsequently commits a crime. A legal owner with a legal firearm will not turn it in at a police buyback because 2 to 50 times as much money can be obtained by selling it.

Firearms confiscated or turned in at buybacks are typically either illegally owned, badly deteriorated, or have been illegally modified.


#12

Ok, modified sequence:
Step 1) licensed gun dealers sell firearms to police as part of a buy-back programme
Step 2) Police "donate" firearms they buy back to licensed gun dealers
Step 3) GOTO Step1)


#13

Using the actual firearm's serial number is not cool from a privacy standpoint. In gun buy-backs, anonymity is usually promised to those who turn guns in. It's something of a broken promise to then turn around and reveal the firearm's serial number, because the serial number may be present -- and linked to the owner's name -- in any number of public and private records.

Admittedly, those records are usually pretty hard to get hold of -- they're usually things like gun-dealer sales records, government gun-registration databases, moving company and pawn-shop records, etc -- but the police nonetheless has no business eroding a citizen's privacy after promising anonymity.


#14

The people who destroy World War II relics to make a sloppy anti-gun political message are the absolute scum of the earth. They deserve to have their fingers pulled off with pliers.


#15

I lost mine once.

Silverly.

On a misstaken path.

Nearly.

wink


#16

I'd rather see old gun and their parts used in making non-firing sci-fi props like those assemblage ray guns Cory likes so much, or the blasters Harrison Ford used in Star Wars and Blade Runner.

I guess jewelry's fine too, though it might be cooler if the final product were more true to its source material in appearance. Jewelry making used to be a fairly serious hobby of mine.


#17

something like this?

http://doc-0o-8g-3dwarehouse.googleusercontent.com/3dwarehouse/secure/hhulr73hmmak89paul31eote4ben7ngk/deh0pl8mk4docpvpf04adkr2fi0hjk0t/1384387200000/lt/*/31f060fc5c345c63e74ea4ff929a1b0d?ts=1333280793000&ctyp=other


#18

Yeah, this is possible until the police catch on.


#19

Catch on? Working as designed, more like.


#20

A little harsh. For the average person, it's far from obvious how to safely, legally, and responsibly get rid of a gun they don't want. Keeping it around the house might not feel safe. Simply selling it to a stranger, though legal, can seem pretty irresponsible. So, these police sponsored buy-backs can seem like an awfully attractive choice.

Advocating torture for someone who doesn't share your enthusiasm for firearms? Not really helping the cause.