Languages

Real sticklers use colons and semicolons.

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:thinking: It just occurred to me that there’s a form of “You’re welcome” that’s definitely passive-aggressive. It just has to be said when someone else fails to say “Thank you.” :smiling_imp:

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I’m sure that “no worries” can be similarly voiced.

I don’t recommend used colons unless they are Certified Pre-Owned.

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I generally buy direct from owner, but I’ve heard ColonFax is trustworthy.

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Okay boomer! I have seen the kids laugh at Generation X because we love ellipses. Apparently it’s a thing. They also consider full stops at the end of sentences as being passive aggressive.

Or saying “thank you” when someone doesn’t do anything.

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I blame my boomer boss for my overuse of ellipses! She uses them prolifically, and it’s seeped into my email communications over the past 13 years. I wonder if I’ll ever be able to break the habit…
:wink:

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I only use them when my train of thought is pulling wheezily into the station.

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Louis-Ferdinand Celine… has entered… the… ch… at…

image

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As II have not yet read Celine, I’ll hacve to take this reviewer’s word for it.

Céline combined scabrous wit, unsentimental depictions of human behavior, hallucinations and rants. While Journey tells the tale of Bardamu-Céline’s experiences in World War I, French colonial Africa, and postwar Paris, Death focuses almost entirely on the childhood experiences of a fictional character named Ferdinand. Journey is written with standard paragraphs and sentences, whereas Death introduces the reader to the reader to the notorious three dots (…).

To readers unfamiliar with Céline’s style, the three dots can be a point of contention. Unlike English, where the ellipses are seen as pauses and breaks, the French read it in the opposite manner. The three dots function as a means to push the reader forward. As Céline’s later works testify, he pushes the forward momentum of the reader to near delirium, practically sacrificing continuity and comprehensibility.

This is the periodic reminder that millennials are currently in their thirties.

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That’s coming across as really passive aggressive…

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Not Funny Reaction GIF by The Drew Barrymore Show

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When I see ellipses used by French writers, the “audible pause” heard in that language comes to mind. I notice it most often when there are multiple speakers (as in the program below), and the one talking isn’t ready to yield to another speaker:

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Well, I’m one of them, so I did feel a bit personally attacked

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True, but they’re still digital natives and anyone older isn’t, unless they grew up on a college campus or something.

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How groups keep their languages and dialects alive and thriving despite changes like this:

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