Lousy tank driver swerves into car on public road


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/08/30/lousy-tank-driver-sideswipes-c.html


#2

Вы ввернули это!


#3

Looks like he took the corner too fast and fish tailed. Guessing treads don’t have great traction on wet roads.


#4

Discusses how they did the tank-sliding stunts in the Bond films.


#5

I believe tracked armored vehicles are optimized to maintain mobility on soft, loose surfaces (mud, sand, snow). They have comparatively low ground pressure, so on hard, slick surfaces, they’re actually more skid-prone than passenger cars.


#6

Lol, you can’t really back your vehicle through a corner if you don’t have any front wheels to point in your intended direction…

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#7

It’s Russia, so it just could’ve been some yahoo with a tank. Don’t go blaming their army too quickly!


#8

I’ve done Donuts in an M1A1 before. A light frost on the road can make it really slick.


#9


#10

Is that a tank or mobile artillery?


#11

Pics or it didn’t happen :wink:


#12

Well, consider how much contact a tank makes with the road, compared to that of an average car; those treads must be pretty worn out to skid like that.


#13

Looks like a MT-LB Armored Personnel Carrier with something mounted on top. Or maybe they were just using them to move some other equipment around.


#14

At least it’s armored enough for when the car driver pulls the inevitable ax or whatever out of their trunk. (Mandatory in Russian driving videos.)


#15

Ah, the crazy days of 1996, when you had to buy 35mm film, use a camera, take your picture, hope for the best, and send the film away for the results. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose! Good times. Here I am with my sweet ride in the background.


#16

Anecdotally:

I have been told by people who actually drove tracks in the Army, that the guidance for driving when the road surface was known ahead of time to be icy was to remove every third rubber tread block, to allow the metal of the track shoe to bite into the ice.

You didn’t want to do this unless there was an actual layer of ice on the road, because otherwise it chewed the asphalt to bits.

This is old memory, and second hand, at best.

Maybe @NukeML will set me straight if I’ve misrepresented practice.


#17

I believe this is the correct soundtrack for this video:


#18

I hadn’t heard that one. I’d heard a myth in the past that if you removed the track, flipped it over and reattached it (not a simple feat) it would give better traction. Sure, the sprocket will still grab the end connectors but the center guides would tear up the hull.

There about 20 feet of track on each side. Taking off every third track pad would take forever, assuming the retains bolts weren’t worn out. The metal track still wouldn’t be in contact with the ground either. You’re better off driving slowly.


#19

Not me, but good for a chuckle.


#20

Have you ever mounted grousers on a vehicle that you drove (or were part of the crew)?