Magical History Tour

And she did it backwards and in heels!

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Why isn’t that man in charge?

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But to convince them you believe it you have to risk a crew to drop some bombs on it.

Sure, but then drop real bombs not wooden ones.

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If they want earlier Europeans in Virginia- they’re not going to like the answer.

“ DNA Evidence of a Croatian and Sephardic Jewish Settlement on the North Carolina Coast Dating from the Mid to Late 1500s
Elizabeth C. Hirschman James A. Vance
Jesse D. Harris
Follow this and additional works at: https://digitalcommons.n

https://digitalcommons.northgeorgia.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1361&context=issr

Of course- if it’s Europeans in the US - Columbus got to Puerto Rico in 1493. Not sure why they’re Virginia focused - could just as easily be the Spanish in Florida if they’re mainland focused.

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Yeah - that does make it seem more likely some cheeky bastard was razzing them.

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What-ho, Squiffy. They had just the chaps to do it, too. Like that time when bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how’s your father. Hairy blighter, dicky-birdied, feathered back on his Sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harper’s and caught his can in the Bertie.

 
Seriously though, units like the reconnaissance/pathfinder squadrons equipped with Mosquitos did some serious flying.
I wouldn’t put it past them to make a little detour on the way back and pull a little stunt just for fun, and because they could.

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[…]
The notoriety of the Lion of Lucerne also extended across the Atlantic becoming the model for the Lion in Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta, in homage to the Unknown Confederate Soldier.
[…]

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When Germany invaded Denmark in World War II, Hungarian chemist George de Hevesy dissolved the gold Nobel Prizes of German physicists Max von Laue (1914) and James Franck (1925) in aqua regia to prevent the Nazis from confiscating them. The German government had prohibited Germans from accepting or keeping any Nobel Prize after jailed peace activist Carl von Ossietzky had received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1935. De Hevesy placed the resulting solution on a shelf in his laboratory at the Niels Bohr Institute. It was subsequently ignored by the Nazis who thought the jar—one of perhaps hundreds on the shelving—contained common chemicals. After the war, de Hevesy returned to find the solution undisturbed and precipitated the gold out of the acid. The gold was returned to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Nobel Foundation. They re-cast the medals and again presented them to Laue and Franck.[13][14]

Mind.
Blown.

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You know what they say, chemists have solutions.

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Here’s an interesting piece on the mistaken belief that ancient sculptures were white, the impact on cultures/artists, and the attempts to correct that view of art - as well as the people depicted in it:

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I saw that exhibition a few years ago, but I can’t remember where and googling provides a list of museums I haven’t been to. It was part of a larger exhibit that gave a 3-D representation of 24 hours in a village at the time. There was a staircase tower one could climb and look more closely at every level in all directions. Really excellent exhibit. Probably in Germany, but if so it would have been in or near Berlin, not Hamburg (which is what is listed).

They also do things like project the color onto the white replica statue, off and on, so you can see the difference that way.

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Interesting, but no need to “rewrite hisory”, I think. An annotation should do.
Trigonometry wasn’t so much “invented” by Pythagoras et al as documented and formalised. In a way that survived until modern times. Who knows who else did it before, during and afterwards, without having their records survive them. (Always make copies!)

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