Manhattan-sized hole opens up under Antarctic glacier

Speaking of Water:

2099: “Daddy, why did they call Earth the big blue marble?”

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In this case, it looks pretty close.

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Fargin’ icehole!

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These Trump references are really getting out of hand.

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How much is that in whales, or football stadiums?

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Christ, what an asshole.

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but that’s good too, i have fewer “bills” then.

Sorry, neither is a proper unit.

We are talking 2.8297 MilliWales (or 14514.0663 football pitches) here.

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just as losing the papers which tell you what you owe means more collectors at your door;
losing the water stored as ice means more water at your shore.

edit:

because we are so sad.

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“American football” or the one the rest of the world calls “football”.?

I, I don"t know that. Arghhhhh

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Which, oddly, made me think of Georgia Satellites.

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25000 Sydharbs

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and spotlighting the dire threat posed by rising seas to coastal cities around the world, including New York City and Miami.

I love that it has to be emphasised that “coastal cities” includes NYC and Miami and not just some thousands of other coastal cities in the world that no one important gives a fuck about.

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maybe that’s why I found the hurricane sandy donation action on my part such an undenied part of the world… besides a certain tv advertisement made by some company about flooding in nyc to be shocking…

It’s a regular hole, not a wormhole. We still have to deal with conservation of mass.

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Well we could sure use some of that warm glacier melting water here in the good old USA right about now. Whatever happened to global warming??!?!?!!!??

Scientists thought it was completely solid until they did these scans. This shows that what they thought was a relatively stable part of the glacier to melting from the bottom upwards, until it’s unstable enough that it collapses.

Here’s a quote from Scientific American explaining some other aspects on why this is bad:

Generally, scientists expect ice to retreat, or move inland, at the fastest rates in places where the ground beneath the ice slopes downward—it should essentially allow the ice to slip over the bedrock more easily as it slides downhill. Similarly, it seems logical that the ice should be more stable in places where the ground slopes uphill as it moves inland.

But the new study has identified parts of the Thwaites Glacier where the opposite is true. Places that slope upward are actually retreating faster than nearby locations where the ground slopes downward.

The reason appears to be linked to the pattern of underground cavities beneath the ice, which allow warm seawater easier access to some parts of the ice than others. The fastest melting places are the ones most affected by the ocean’s intrusion—even when it looks as though the shape of the bedrock should be stabilizing the ice.

One of these spots is currently melting at the fastest rate of any ice shelf on record in Antarctica, the study suggests.

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All of the Thwaites glacier has been described as the size of the state of Florida. This hole the size of Manhattan isn’t big enough to change the overall sea level, the big thing is that scientists didn’t know that it was there until these recent scans. They thought this part of the glacier was relatively stable not realizing it was melting from the bottom up. This all melted within the last 3 years or so, with many other smaller cavities around the glacier. This kind of melting hasn’t been included in any of existing models of how the Antarctic is melting, so the new information changes how quickly things are happening there.

If all of the Thwaites glacier were to melt into the ocean it would raise the sea level by around 2 feet. It’s also holding back several glaciers behind it, which if they came loose if Thwaites glacier wasn’t there would add an additional 8 feet to the sea level.

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