Mount Washington Observatory shares video of man being blown away by 109-mph winds


#1

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#2

I should be doing that! Why am I not doing that! WHY?!


#3

Mount Washington is interesting. It’s not particularly tall in comparison to other mountains in the country, but tall for its region. It also sticks up into the confluence of 2 jetstreams, which makes for the crazy wind and weather.


#4

That looks like fun and I want to do it. I’ve heard that the winds on the Oregon coast can get pretty fierce in stormy weather, so that you can at least lean over a bit (and I’ve long wanted to do that too), but I don’t know if they’re that strong.


#5

It’s worth the trip to the top if you’re in the area. They have a bunch of videos on display, shot by the meteorologists in the winter, all of which are as funny as this one.

Opening scene, it’s winter on Mt. Washington, one man, a table, a bowl, a spoon, and a box of breakfast cereal…

/if you go, turn on your car’s air conditioner on the way down. It’ll save you a lot of braking.


#6

The gully climbs are supposed to be worth it for those who like wielding an ice axe as well, though I always feel weird about spending that kind of effort only to top out in a parking lot.


#7

A lot of people have died on that mountain in the winter, some less than 100m from the station.

Me, I’m too too old.


#8

Oh. I’m fully aware of the seriousness of the weather there. It’s an interestingly anomalous spot. Not to be trifled with for sure.


#9

I want whatever boots they’re wearing, that’s some pretty darn good grip.

I love the heck out of the soles on my vibrams but I don’t think they could cling like that.


#10

No you’re not!


#11

Chicago winters. Never again.


#12

Ben Affleck did a whole segment from the observatory including the “being blown around” bit when he was like, 12:

Still remember watching that show in class.

And yeah, he did already occasionally demonstrate “slack-jawed empty stare” in the same way we associate with him today.


#13

I was thinking Yaktrax?


#14

I initially read that as “Me, too, I’m told.”


#15

It isn’t as tall - but has a significant amount of vertical as many of the others further inland start so much higher above sea level at base.

It was a nice hike when I did it years ago. Not really in that kind of shape anymore. In August - in the 90’s at the base - 45-50 degrees at the top. Windy even on a nice, clear day. Lovely hike past lake of the clouds, Tuckerman’s Ravine. It was a disappointment to get to the top & have a parking lot. But - you just go back down and around a hundred feet & that disappeared again.

I had my traditional pepperidge farm cookies at the summit. People looked at their gorp forlornly.


#16

I’ve carried in cornish game hens and a couple of cans of beer for the first day of two week backcountry trips before. People with freeze dried food only get hella jealous. :slight_smile:


#17

Try a flask of pear brandy for end of day. Less weight - more servings. Tasty!


#18

Been up there many times, from nearly all approaches. The hikes are terrific. The summit with the center and the parking lot and the cog railway terminus is such a part of the regional lore, that its not such a letdown after cimbing, I wish it all were not there, but it’s fun for people to get up into the alpine zone…pretty much the same as far nothern Labrador. That said, the weather is truly dangerous…often insanely so. Most recent adventure for me: went up with some pals via Amonoosuc Ravine…summer temps at the bottom, raging blizzard from Lakes of the Clouds.to the summit. You have to be prepared for anything, anytime. Forecasts are imprecise to say the least. People do die up there every year…some of them well equipped and experienced. Unlike any other spot on the planet.


#19

I think he could get funding for that.


#20

This time of year, for the White Mountains, I’d take my Kahtoola Microspikes. My Black Diamond Contact crampons would be overkill, unless there’s still more ice than it looks in the pictures. But I would bring at least microspikes, because I’ve been caught in unforecast blizzard conditions in the Whites in June.

There aren’t all that many places where this sign would be necessary. The buildings atop Mount Washington are among that set of unusual places.