New Yorkers: To avoid Ebola, don't eat Ebola-infused poop or snot


#1

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#2

but if you know where the poop came from, chow down!


#3

We need to ban all flights from India, where thousands of people die from the measles. Measles is extremely contagious and many Americans are unvaccinated.


#4

Of course, that makes sense – I am not going to eat strange feces that I find on the subway. The question that I have is how do I tell if the normal feces that a nice young woman hands me is safe – is there some sort of cup that changes color in the presence of ebola?


#5

Soon I expect people will be minding their own business when ebola infected people will sneak into homes to vomit on unsuspecting people. It will totally be the next step in New York.


#6

The question that I have is how do I tell if the normal feces that a nice young woman hands me is safe – is there some sort of cup that changes color in the presence of ebola?

Does this girl have a friend help her fill it?


#7

I understand that this is actually all part of ISIL’s plan. First, they came for our freedom…

I’ll take collective hysteria for $200, Alex.


#8

Ebola infused poop and snot?

Shoot, a fella could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff!


#9

@crenquis & @BackToYouJim while the video being eluded to traumatized me a bit, the reaction videos were absolutely priceless!


#10

In theory, one could use the same technique to avoid lots of diseases; polio is mostly transmitted fecal-oral. Reality isn’t always so cooperative.


#11

agreed. and it isn’t just poop or snot, many other bodily fluids can transmit, and while not “airborne” a good sneeze can particalize a lot of saliva and snot into an ebola mist. plus if you’ve ever watched 20/20 you know that testing for fecal matter turns up positive almost everywhere, phones, hand railings, door knobs, restaurant silverware, etc. fortunately ebola is not very hardy outside of the body…so it typically takes a “fresh” exposure. :slight_smile:


#12

The long list of situational phobias includes the fears of being bound, beaten, locked into an enclosed area, and smeared with human waste. Their inclusion mystifies me, as it suggests that these fears might be considered in any way unreasonable. I asked myself, Who wants to be handcuffed and covered in human feces? And then, without even opening my address book, I thought of three people right off the bat.

-David Sedaris

I’d bet that at least two of those three people live in New York.


#13

The lesser known and certainly less glamorous part of the space program was the disinfecting of the Shuttle after each landing. Trust me, zero-G makes this floating-particulates problem WAY WAY worse.


#14

Oh sure, now you tell me.

Nom nom nom…


#15

first off…ewwww.

secondly, technically the olfactory senses are particle based, so if you smell a fart, then yep, that is shit particles in your nose. I’m pretty sure but not positive that ebola can’t travel on particles that small though, anyone know?


#16

The fart smell is a mix of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, in gaseous state, as individual molecules. Not “particles” in conventional atmospheric-chemistry sense (“particulates” is better word to distinguish between molecules and solid or liquid aerosols). See also Standard bathroom malodor.

Ebola is a virus, a fairly big thing in comparison. It can travel on its own (I don’t know for how long it can survive “naked”), but more often it hitchhikes on some fomites that make the bigger dust particles and provide some shielding from the air and light.


#17

I believe the proper scientifically-accepted term is farticles.

At least, that’s what Wikipedia said.


#18

I heard that Airbus forgot to seal the chemical toilet on one of their flight test aircraft before conducting a negative-g flight. Apparently you could see the liquid flowing along the ceiling…until the manoeuvre ended.


#19

Would sub-standard bathroom malodor be better, or worse?


#20

I don’t know. This is an actual composition specced and then standardized by US govt for measuring efficiency of deodorizers, if I remember correctly.
Actual description here; apparently it is very vile, possibly enough to make flies barf.

My inexperienced guess is that the substandard ones won’t be by far as bad.

But then, all I got to play with were lower molecular weight aliphatic thiols. Their virtue is not as much the strength of the stench as the low concentration needed for the olfactory pleasure. And the butyl one, while oily and not eager to vaporize, lingers on.

For really really vile stenches you can go back to inorganic chemistry and visit the ol’ carbon diselenide and find out why there is so much effort to develop synthetic pathways that do not use it.