Police op-ed in LA Times: 'Do what I tell you,' I may shoot you if you 'threaten to sue me'


#1

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#2

Christ, what a fascist.


#3

Well there you go then -- comply or you will get hurt.

At least one of them is honest about how most of them think.


#4

Well, there you have it. The rot permeates from the top down and from academia out.


#5

i dunno if Colorado Technical University counts as "academia" in the strictest sense, but yeah, generally it does that.


#6

"How difficult is it to cooperate for that long?''

Funny, I was going to ask you the same thing regarding the Constitution...


#7

If you pretend the Constitution doesn't exist, my job is easier and you don't get a broken arm--unless I'm bored, your skin color annoys me, or whatever.


#8

Did anyone read the whole article, or just the fascist sound bite? He freely acknowledges there are bully cops and unwarranted stops. All he is recommending is to get through the event, no matter how unjust, and then sue their asses.


#9

Ah, I see then. The most likely way to not be on the receiving end of violence is to remember that you can be shot for "disrespect of cop."


#10

In other words, treat all police as if they are members of a heavily armed, organized paramilitary group that are not subject to the same laws and morals as the rest of us. I'm always extremely wary of people that are tooled-up and out looking for trouble. frowning


#11

Agreed. I'm not sure this guy is the bad guy here.

I am aware that corrupt and bully cops exist. When it comes to police misconduct, I side with the ACLU: Having worked as an internal affairs investigator, I know that some officers engage in unprofessional and arrogant behavior; sometimes they behave like criminals themselves. I also believe every cop should use a body camera to record interactions with the community at all times. Every police car should have a video recorder.


#12

I did. I'm amazed that he can write this in the same article:

"Don’t argue with me,''
"You can refuse consent to search your car or home if there’s no warrant"
"Do what the officer tells you to and it will end safely for both of you."
"Just don’t challenge a cop during a stop."
"Community members deserve courtesy, respect and professionalism from their officers."

Well, which one should I be doing, everything they tell me or refusing consent? Should I call them out on the lack of respect or not challenge them?


#13

We should just agree that he doesn't want to look like he's a bad guy.


#14

Actually he sounds pretty reasonable.

"I know it is scary for people to be stopped by cops. I also understand
the anger and frustration if people believe they have been stopped
unjustly or without a reason. I am aware that corrupt and bully cops
exist. When it comes to police misconduct, I side with the ACLU: Having
worked as an internal affairs investigator, I know that some officers
engage in unprofessional and arrogant behavior; sometimes they behave
like criminals themselves. I also believe every cop should use a body
camera to record interactions with the community at all times. Every
police car should have a video recorder. (This will prevent a situation
like Mike Brown’s shooting, about which conflicting and self-serving
statements allow people to believe what they want.) And you don’t have
to submit to an illegal stop or search. You can refuse consent to search
your car or home if there’s no warrant (though a pat-down is still
allowed if there is cause for suspicion). Always ask the officer
whether you are under detention or are free to leave. Unless the officer
has a legal basis to stop and search you, he or she must let you go.
Finally, cops are legally prohibited from using excessive force: The
moment a suspect submits and stops resisting, the officers must cease
use of force."


#15

I am autistic, I am disabled, and I have ptsd from police violence.

I may not be able to cooperate with that cop or with any other abusers.


#16

Totally.

"We are still learning what transpired between Officer Darren Wilson and Brown, but in most cases it’s less ambiguous — and officers are rarely at fault.''

Rarely at fault. Huh.

"An average person cannot comprehend the risks and has no true understanding of a cop’s job. ''

Goodness knows average folks can't ever imagine what life might really be like for these people. For that matter, he can't comprehend my job or what it's like to be me, so why should he even bother?


#17

The only time in my life I've been stopped and searched by the police, I was in a train station foyer. The officer apologised to me and said he'd picked me because I'm white and that he was told to go balance the statistics.


#18

That doesn't really sound like probable cause, but I suppose it's marginally better than getting shot.


#19

Just echoing others here, but when you combine:

with:

"if you don’t want to get shot, tased, pepper-sprayed, struck with a baton or thrown to the ground, just do what I tell you."

You get unreasonable. Not to mention a lack of self-awareness and possible plain old stupidity.


#20

When police wear body cameras, violent confrontations with the public drop by HALF. What does that tell you? It's not the public that's altering their behavior because of these cameras, which are virtually unnoticeable among all the other equipment attached to a modern police officer. It's the officer who is now required to act as if the world is watching. So don't tell us that we're the ones who need to alter our behavior.