Russia bans U.S. food imports


#1

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#2

Perhaps a stupid economics question: won’t this lead to an unplanned surplus of such goods in the sanctioned nations, and therefore lower prices on these goods for citizens of those countries as the supply-and-demand balance is tipped? Aside from the possible waste of perishable goods, what is the downside for the exporting countries when we’re talking about goods that can’t be easily supplied by Russian industry or other non-sanctioned nations?


#3

None supposing this is the final dick move that angers Russians enough to cast off their self-appointed President-for-Life.


#4

Not likely: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/03/26/putins-approval-rating-hits-80-percent/


#5

Lower prices aren’t good for farmers.


#6

Australia, Canada and Norway

Someone paid attention to us!


#7

Suppliers might have trouble finding markets for their goods, but honestly, I think Europe will be fine. It will probably all end up being funneled through Byeloruss (or “Chile” or some other smugglery), and the only people hurt will be Russians who will have to pay more for the exact same goods. But some gangsters will make out.

This may finally turn around Putin’s little game of “Stop hitting yourself! Stop hitting yourself!”


#8

I’m sure Russia doesn’t have to fear food scarcity, but if people start suffering from shortages then I’m sure their government would have cause for concern. I’m going to assume that they are doing this move knowing they will have enough food even with food import bans, it’s all about showing and posturing for the Russian masses.


#9

I am not sure Russia is an environment where people say they hate putin over the phone to strangers. But at the very least, they do fear him. The russian people seem so brave in their internet video, yet so timid in politics.


#10

Very much like American Rednecks. Vigorously independent, but what their employers say about politics is what they drop their eyes to and bend over for.


#11

Interestingly enough, this Kremlin threat happened last year to the polling company that just published those high numbers. The Kremlin threat was reported multiple places. Here’s a direct link to the poll site, and you’ll see that Putin’s popularity was steadily declining - right up until the Kremlin threatened to shut down the pollsters. It’s been up, and stayed up, ever since.


#12

Russia joins the international community and imposes sanctions on itself, this time prohibiting other countries to trade food with Russia, further widening the already harsh trade embargoes in place. Good Job.


#13

Something something Grain Sales to Soviets.


#14

Now the crucial question for each embargo/sanction/blockade: how we could make money on smuggling…


#15

With how their media machine has been going, it would not surprise me if they blame food shortages on countries they are banning imports from. Good loyal Russians suffer for the greater Russia. If nothing more, the food is going to be blander there.


#16

Expect root vegetables and cream-based foods.


#17

After several rounds of US/EU sanctions against them, Russia finally slaps back hard! 1 year of import sanctions is a heavy price the EU pays (but not the US!) for following along with US madness. The real hurt will be this winter, if Russia revokes rights to EU commercial air travel in it’s airspace. EU flights will have to take the long way around to Asia, while Asian airlines will be granted access. It’s remarkable how well the US/EU has been outmaneuvered in this entire series of events. Hopefully, the cost financially and politically will end anymore US adventures abroad. So long to the Unipolar World!


#18

Oh Russia, you so crazy.
On the upside, more Borscht for everyone!
Borscht is awesome. Crazy awesome.

oops, @catgrin beat me to it, and with more class and mystery…


#19

In Putin’s Russia, borscht hungers you.


#20

Borscht is people!